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The ABCs and 123s of Social Listening

The Greek philosopher Epictetus once said, “We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.” This is an important adage to embrace, especially with social media marketing programs. Listening enables you to understand what people expect from your brand and how they feel about your products. It can also give you valuable insights to guide your strategy and develop deeper, more meaningful relationships with your customers.

All too often, a common failure with brands is that they speak twice as much as they listen – or worse yet, they don’t listen at all:

  • 56% of customer tweets to companies are being ignored (source)
  • 70% of brands ignore complaints on Twitter (source)
  • 39% of companies do not track their social media responses at all, and 55% ignore all customer feedback on Twitter and Facebook, largely because they have no process in place to respond (source)

Companies who fail to listen are losing an opportunity to satisfy and engage customers, and they also miss out on other strategic benefits. Listening delivers great value during the strategic planning process as well as in tactical operations. It can help you:

  • Identify emerging trends
  • Provide competitive insights
  • Discover product issues and concerns
  • Manage crisis and mitigate risk
  • Uncover sales leads
  • Find influencers and advocates
  • Guide your content marketing strategy

Sophisticated listening guides our approach at Cisco. We implemented a Social Media Listening Center (SMLC) to visualize conversations that are relevant to us. Our listening center started out as a single-screen display outside of our CMO’s office. Now, it is a multi-screen experience that enables customized visualizations in real time. It features conversations related to our brand, trends, influencers, and sentiment, as well as short-term activities such as new product launches, major campaigns/sponsorships, and our annual customer conference, Cisco Live.

But listening alone is not enough. Today’s social media savvy customers expect companies not only to listen, but also to respond. A study by Edison Research found that 67% of people want a response within 24 hours or less. This is where the “ABCs and 123s of Social Listening” comes into play.

ABCs

Step 1:  Action-Based Conversations (ABCs)

Cisco is mentioned 5-7K times a day and roughly 3% of those conversations are actionable. Using our listening tools, we developed a process to help filter out the noise and identify the ABCs. These conversations are then categorized into one of the six categories below:

  • Support – Request for help resolving real-time issue
  • Question – General inquiries and product questions
  • Critic – Conversations that merit brand management consideration
  • Buzz – Praise from Cisco fan or advocate
  • Lead – Pronouncement of near-term purchase decision
  • Idea – Request to enhance a product with a new feature

Step 2:  123s

After we identify and categorize the ABCs, we then prioritize them into 3 levels. Priority 1 conversations typically have a 24-hour response time, and priority 2 conversations have a 72-hour response time. Priority 3 conversations fall in the discretionary response category.

Step 3:  Route and Respond

Once conversations are tagged, they are routed through our social content management platform to the appropriate team members and experts who can provide a response within the designated time frame.

Step 4:  Measure and Evaluate

As with any marketing program, it’s extremely important to measure your results and set targets for success. At Cisco, we began by tracking baseline metrics such as the number of action-based conversations and replies. Now we also track reach, revenue from listening for leads, average response time and adherence to SLAs (i.e. response posted within the recommended time period). We monitor these performance indicators and make adjustments to the program as needed to ensure continued success for Cisco and our customers.

Listening isn’t always easy, but it’s well worth the effort. The more you listen and interact with those who are talking about your company, the greater opportunity you have to build connections and increase the visibility of your brand. Having a formal program in place to not only listen, but also respond offers many rewards ranging from increased customer satisfaction to positive brand perception to new revenue opportunities. Just remember your listening ABCs and 123s, and you will be well on your way to creating meaningful relationships with your customers.

Social Selling in Action—Part 3: Regional Rollout, Regional Strengths

As the number of users of social media continues to grow, the boundary between our personal and professional  lives begins to overlap. Unsurprisingly, the customer buying cycle is also beginning to change. By the time a prospect has reached out to a sales rep, in most cases they already know what they want because they’ve done their research on social channels, canvassed their peers on community forums and downloaded materials.  Where the customer goes, so does sales.

Carolyn Charles, Project Specialist and Bernard Chiu, Project Specialist, have been helping to lead the effort to transform traditional selling at Cisco into social selling. Their social selling strategy leverages the skills and expertise of Cisco sales reps by giving them the tools and support they need to interact and engage with customers in this new and constantly changing environment.

I spoke with Carolyn and Bernard separately to discuss the innovation that is taking place within the Social Selling program.

In part 3 of a 3-part series, Carolyn talks about regional differences and how different groups are leveraging new social selling capabilities. Read Part 1: Innovation Starts with Sales for an introduction to the social selling program at Cisco.  Read Part 2: Attribution for Accurate Metrics for a view into how Cisco is tracking the impact of Social Selling.


JR:  You’ve rolled out Social Selling into APJC (Asia Pacific, Japan, China) and EMEAR (Europe, Middle East, Africa, Russia), how are things going? Have you noticed any differences in how the regions are adopting these new capabilities?

Carolyn Charles: There’s a lot of excitement and passion, particularly in the APJC region. Each region works quite differently with the technology. Twitter is more likely to be used in the Americas than in EMEAR, but ultimately the teams all have a very similar style of working. They all are on  the same page wanting to be involved and using the latest and greatest technology—they’re willing to try anything. I found that the APJC sales team really enjoys the one-on-one connection that LinkedIn enables. Many of them are in new roles and are eager get started and feel that Social Selling is an ideal way to meet their new customers.

 

The Americas team is a little further along in the program because that is where it was rolled out first.  For EMEAR & APJC, this is quite new and they have a real passion for it; they are thinking outside the box and actually innovating beyond what we have formally rolled out. For example, one of the sales reps in EMEAR has created a group for his partners. They are thinking creatively and are pioneering new ways of working with their customers and prospects.

JR: Have there been any surprises in the Social Selling program?

CC: I never thought we’d get SQLs (Sales Qualified Leads) so quickly. We were very surprised it happened so soon and so quickly. I was also pleasantly surprised how up for it the sales guys are—how supportive they’ve been. I haven’t heard anyone saying “oh, not another thing they’re making us do” but rather “yeah, this is going to work.”  They’re getting marketing support and wanting to use it in their everyday efforts, and they’re also taking the initiative and trying things on their own.

JR: At a high level, what have you learned from the program?

CC: The adoption has reflected some generational differences. Our team are generally early in career and are thus actively involved in finding the best ways to use social media in their day-to-day life. They are not just using what we give them, but are actively suggesting and trying new ideas. I’ve learned there are so many new ways to communicate, and that the sales team like to control how they communicate with their network through the type and frequency of posts they use. I think these new methods of communicating will help our sales team develop new contacts, which can be really hard to do.

JR: What do you think of the status of Social Selling at Cisco?

CC: I’m really proud that on our “Full Circle Giving Back” day, when our VP John Donovan was asked by the CEO of the charity we were supporting how they can increase their visibility to potential contributors, John said social media is the way forward. The scope of how you reach people is much bigger today, and it’s how people want to connect.  I think it shows he is 150% behind the initiative.  I think Cisco, on the whole, is on par with most other enterprises of this size, but I also think there is a lot of excitement. There’s been a shift – new talk from Cisco’s leadership that sounds very powerful. “Be amazing or be surpassed” was one call out that resonated with me personally. I think this is what customers want and how our social network will evolve. It’s going to get more and more exciting.


Jennifer Roberts (@rideboulderco) is a Social Media Marketing Manager and leads the Social Selling program. Carolyn Charles is a Project Specialist and co-leads the Social Selling program.

Networking Goes Social

As you probably know, networking can bring your career to a new level. Who you meet can open a variety of doors – you’re able to meet new clients, gain referrals, meet future peers, find a mentor, or begin a new partnership. The possibilities are endless.

Gone are the days where you would print out a stack of business cards and keep them in your wallet to hand out wherever you go. Now, with the digital age, your business card is your social presence. Interacting with someone digitally is the new norm; connecting with a colleague on LinkedIn, tweeting at your favorite brand or company, sharing your favorite articles on Facebook – these are all ways to network from right behind the keyboard.

Networking Goes Social

So, what’s the benefit of getting active on social networks? Here are my top three benefits for taking your networking skills to the computer:

Reach Brands Directly. Many brands are active on social media and are curious about how their customers and partners are using their products. Use this to your advantage and start a conversation about their latest launch, an article they posted, or good customer service. They’ll likely respond back with a follow-up question or a kind note as a way to thank you for reaching out.

Save Time and Money. While you should continue to go to live events when possible, you can network through social channels whenever and wherever you go. You can reach out to brands on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn through your phone or desktop without the hefty price tag that comes with traveling.

Interact with Industry Leaders. If you refer to an article written by an industry leader, tag them by using @[their handle]. On Twitter, for example, many company executives and brands will favorite or retweet your post as a way of engaging back. It’s a way of interacting with people you might otherwise not get the chance to.

Have you started networking online? Share your thoughts in the comments.

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Digital Design Visual and Otherwise

First impressions really matter. We know this intuitively, and you may also have seen the stats that say it takes web visitors less than two-tenths of a second to form a first impression, and just 2.6 seconds for a user’s eyes to land on that area of a website that most influences their first impression. Visitors make their decisions on whether to stay or leave in 10 seconds or less.

Visual design – the photography, graphics, typography and layout on a page — has a lot to do with initial first impressions that your visitors have. While it’s not the only thing, paying attention to visuals in the right places can have an important impact on how you connect and engage with visitors to your web and mobile experiences.

Last week I was on an interesting panel that included some colleagues in digital design from other companies: A well known express shipper, a major wireless provider, a cutting edge design firm. We talked a lot about what makes visual designs work. Then, we talked even more about other factors beyond visuals that are required to make an experience effective.

Where Strong Visuals Matter

Strong visual designs are immensely important in attracting attention and engaging users, especially where they’re new to your brand and company or organization. At Cisco, we have examples of this in our home page, immersive experiences around specific topics such as Internet of Everything and many other places.

A sampling of some of the visual designs in our Cisco.com and mobile digital space.

A sampling of some of the visual designs in our Cisco.com and mobile digital space.

Good and consistent visual design does great things: It helps to quickly establish trust with your brand. It orients people. It keeps your visitors engaged. A good visual design can lead users to the right places on the page, and help them make decisions.

Simplicity Counts

Visual designs don’t need to be extreme or snazzy to be effective: You can use good simple visual design to lead users to a key call to action. For instance, one of our panel members pointed out that good adherence to visual scanning principles makes sure that button and other key elements are obvious, raising the probably that users will engage.  Another follows a strategy of using visual and interactivity and make sure the online experience is enjoyable, fun and efficient.

One of our panelists pointed out that users tend to scan a page in an “F” pattern, looking across the top, down the left side, and the slightly lower and horizontally on the page again. This remains true even with tablets, and probably works the same way even in the horizontal themes that are emerging, such as Wired.co.uk’s new home page design.

OK, but something all of us panelists emphasized is that visuals are just a piece of the digital experience. We all also have many important “boring” pages where visuals are more muted but where principles of good design are essential.

For instance, the visual treatment of this simple search results box below, while perhaps aesthetically “boring,” results in a very effective design that collects the most important information around a product all in one place, lays it out in a very scannable format, and makes it obvious how to connect with someone at Cisco to find out more information.

The search results box on Cisco.com.

The search results box on Cisco.com.

While simple, this is an effective design for our customers and partners who are often working on problems on deadline and need information quickly, unencumbered with fancy visuals or other distractions.

Some Tips From Our Panel

That simple search results design above gets to the heart of the matter: “Design” is much more than bold visuals, and in any design project you should tune your visual design to the user’s goals and the task at hand. Here are some points for the panel:

Design end to end – When you’re design a new experience, think about the entire experience from someone searching on Google or Bing to landing on a mobile page to the offline interactions they may have in between. This experience should “designed” end to end and not just a screen at a time.

Design for actual people – Use personas or other techniques to design for real types or users who are completing real tasks.

Do Some Wireframing and IA up front – Use basic wireframes (simple diagrams of your pages/screens) or concept drawings to articulate the basics of an experience before you dive into an extensive visual design. (but see the next item)

But, visual comps can help – A corollary to the notion of wireframing is to have some strong visual comps on hand that you can show to your sponsors or decision makers. Sadly, black and white wireframes won’t convey the fireworks they’re expecting.

Don’t throw away common sense visual design rules: With today’s poster-oriented page layouts, often assembled with mix-and-match panels, it’s tempting to allow a random quilt to emerge on pages rather than a holistic design. But, with a good visual system, you can balance fidelity of the visuals: Create a design system with a good strong blend of iconography, infographics, photos and the information itself. Avoid blending incompatible styles and leverage modules and patterns to make things easier on your designers and agencies.

 

Embrace change, prototype quickly, be agile – With almost every project now, we create quick prototypes to understand how the designs will work. These are also good tools for testing with users, and demonstrating ideas to our stakeholders.

 

Test and learn – As you have protoypes ready or finished live implementations online, test and tune your designs. And then test some more to optimize. There are a number of tools at your disposal for this, including well-crafted A/B tests (including control groups), usability testing through online self-service or facilitate sessions, five second tests, and other techniques.

Finally: Don’t create a monster you can’t feed – This is perhaps the most important rule of all, and one that it’s hard to convince teams about until they’ve lived through a few projects: You may have the most splendorous design in the world, but if it is hard to update or expensive to maintain, it will quickly go stale and obsolete. To use a real estate analogy, don’t build a 30-room mansion if you can only afford to maintain a small bungalow.  Think through the ongoing costs of production, localization, management and other factors when you create a new design. It’s important not only that a design look good and work well, but that it’s maintainable.

Above all, beware of projects that start out with the main requirement to “do something cool.” If you focus on the true business and user outcomes you want – and follow the advice above – you will like end up with something not only cool but useful.

What have been your experiences?

Some references:

Digital Information World: Infographic on attention spans online

Missouri Science & Technology: First impressions form quickly on the web

Wired UK: How Wired built the new Wired.co.uk homepage

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Fragmented Channels – Integrated Views – The New Virtuous Cycle

Virtuous CycleThe subject of fragmented channels, which is fragmenting audiences, has been written about frequently. Advertisers though, secretly still long for the “glorious” days of focusing on just a few major channels and is one of the reasons why the rare shows that can predictably garner mass audiences (Super Bowl in the US, World Cup Soccer, personality driven radio shows etc.) attract a very high premium.

However, rather than chasing the very few predictable high-audience opportunities, the marketing dollar is much better invested in building up the complete view of your audience by integrating multiple touch points through which they are engaging with your brand. The audience has not disappeared – it is simply spending a smaller slice of time engaged through a particular medium. But brand loyalty is still as real as it ever was in the days of the “MAD MEN“.

And what’s more, the benefit of this integrated view is not simply to drive better marketing and sales leads (which it will), but to also inform corporate strategy – for your stakeholders are talking to you all the time, leaving behind breadcrumbs of valuable information if you are willing to take the effort to piece them together and read them. However, this remains challenging, though progress has been made.

 

VC

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