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Automatic Print Friendliness

October 8, 2007 at 12:00 pm PST

Here’s something you might not notice at first on cisco.com, but will surely appreciate once you discover it: Automatic print friendliness. Read More »

New Design for Cisco.com’s Support Area

October 2, 2007 at 12:00 pm PST

Over this past weekend, the Cisco.com Support area adopted a new navigation model we call “Task Based Navigation.” We think this is an easier way to get around the support area, and this model is well suited for an audience that performs discreet tasks regularly as part of their jobs. We’ve been testing it over the last few months with lots of our support customers, and some of you saw it in person at our booth at Networkers. Read More »

Web 2.0 Beyond the Hype

On the Cisco.com team, we’re often asked by colleagues in other companies “what are you doing with Web 2.0?” The answer depends in part on how you define Web 2.0. At Cisco, we include a wide range of elements, like user participation, engagement, user-generated content, short-form videos, and a mobile platform. We’ve made a concerted effort to include these in Cisco.com over the last year. Some of the efforts have been quite successful, and we’ve learned a lot in the process. One key thing we’ve learned about Web 2.0 features is that it’s important to integrate them into the total experience. Cisco.com is a large corporate website that serves many purposes for many different audiences--customers seeking pre-sales information, others looking for post-sales support, analysts seeking financial data, and/or press seeking the latest news ASAP. It’s a site that inherently has many purposes. I think about it as a manifestation of the entire company online, communicating to and with the market. So, when we can use 2.0 devices to improve communication, integrated within the overall experience, we’re going to be all over it. Here are some of the more popular 2.0 elements we’ve integrated into our pages: Read More »

Mass Extinctions and the New Math

465,003,915 That is how many aggregate subscribers are claimed by 44 of the top self-proclaimed virtual worlds.443,230,979That is the entire population of Mexico, the United States and Canada.Impact_eventWe are all accustomed to the early stages of any technology when individual companies attempt to set the rules and language that will be used for the ensuing battles. There have been expensive fights over simple things like rather to call the aggregation of ISDN B-channels ‘MLPP’ or ‘Bonding’, IP telephony vs IP-PBXs, and so on. There are very tangible benefits to defining the market you are going to compete in. This is Law 5, the Law of Focus, in the classic marketing work The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing by Al Ries and Jack Trout, “The most powerful concept in marketing is owning a word in the prospect’s mind.”This is still going on in the virtual world sector, as every platform with an avatar calls themselves a ‘virtual world’, and attempts to define the rest of the market around their paradigm. What typically follows this Cambrian explosion of platforms and competing technologies (and semantics) is that there is a ‘great rationalization’ (a ‘KT Period‘, to mix my periods/eras/eons/epochs). This space is rapidly becoming ripe for it’s own. Read More »

Hello World: The Cisco.com Web Experience

September 28, 2007 at 12:00 pm PST

This is a new blog about Cisco.com, from some energetic members of the Cisco.com team.Cisco.com is comprised of around two million total pages, covering 6,000 products in 470 families in 18 categories (with 20,000+ product-related pages alone). Our sites sport hundreds of embedded videos (a number growing all the time), countless podcasts and subscription videos on many interesting topics, and scads of technical discussions. And, there are 74 country sites… hosted in 35 languages. As you can imagine, there are some mighty challenges to running a web site like this and keeping the design and content fresh: We’ll be writing about these, and we’ll give you some ideas about how to solve similar design and development puzzles you might have on your own web sites. Some of the things we’re planning to write about are: — All of the continuing improvements we’re making to the Cisco.com site (so you can keep track and make sure you’re not missing anything) --Behind-the-scenes notes about how we design and develop things with you in mind --Trends on the web, especially around the human network and user experience --Periodic sneak previews of early beta features on Cisco.comPlease feel free to chat with us via the comments on this blog, and via your continuing comments into the web sites. We’re listening!