Cisco Blogs

Cisco Blog > Security

AMP Threat Grid integrates with Tripwire Enterprise

Today’s threat landscape is completely different than last year; and next years will be, not surprisingly, even worse. The Industrialization of Hacking has spawned a new era of professional, entrepreneurial, and resourceful cyber criminals. In recent year’s dynamic malware analysis (aka sandboxing) has become the shiny new technology that we all want, no, need to have. At one time anti-virus held this position as well, and the same will eventually be said of sandbox technology used to fight advanced malware.

You may have purchased a sandbox a few years ago but it’s likely that your malware analysis needs have gone beyond the traditional sandboxing technologies that simply extract suspicious samples, analyze in a local virtual machine, and quarantine. You need a more robust malware analysis tool that fits into your infrastructure and can continuously detect even the most advanced threats that are environmentally aware and can evade detection.

Tripwire recently partnered with Cisco and integrated the AMP Threat Grid dynamic malware analysis solutions into Tripwire Enterprise. But why choose this dynamic malware analysis tool? After careful evaluation there were a few key reasons to integrate this tool versus others:

  1. It’s not just dynamic malware analysis

    AMP Threat Grid provides both static and dynamic malware analysis, and a full subscription provides an API that is used to seamlessly deliver context rich threat intelligence into existing security technologies.

  2. Not everyone out there is a security expert

    Heck, very few are. AMP Threat Grid was designed to empower junior security analysts by providing a Threat Score so they can easily determine how malicious a sample is. The behavioral indicators are written in plain English so they can understand what the file is doing, and why its behavior is malicious, suspicious, or benign.

    Tripwire Sandboxing 1

  3. Lack of instrumentation

    AMP Threat Grid was designed without any instrumentation inside the virtual machine. Most experts agree that around 40% of today’s malware is environment aware, checking to see if it is running in a sandbox or the age of the operating system before detonating.

There are 3 ways that most people deploy a malware analysis tool:

  1. A stand-alone solution designed to feed itself samples for analysis without dependency on other security products. This has the most flexibility in deployment but adds significant hardware costs and complexity to management and analysis, especially for distributed enterprises.
  2. A distributed feeding sensor approach, such as firewalls, IPS, or UTMs with built-in sandboxing capabilities. These solutions are usually cost effective and easy to deploy but are less effective in detecting a broad range of suspicious files including web files. They can also introduce bandwidth limitations that can hamper network performance and privacy concerns when a cloud-based solution is the only option.
  3. Built into secure content gateways, such as web or email gateways. This approach is also cost effective but focuses on web and email channels only and also introduces performance limitations and privacy concerns.

Since Tripwire is already monitoring and collecting the data on your mission critical systems, these approaches don’t seem to work. But there’s a fourth way that actually takes the best of what these approaches offer and raises the bar to help you fight well-funded attackers that get better at what they do every day: Cisco AMP Threat Grid. Through AMP Threat Grid, Cisco offers advanced malware analysis and intelligence that delivers integration directly with Tripwire Enterprise providing you with a better ROI and more visibility into what is happening in your environment. Tripwire has integrated AMP Threat Grid into their Tripwire Enterprise, providing both static and dynamic analysis so you can better understand the malware targeting your organization, as well as the ability to automate the consumption of threat intelligence into your existing security infrastructure.

How does the Integration actually work?

AMP Threat Grid’s content driven security analytics dynamically and statically analyzes all submitted files, executing the sample in a safe environment, examining the behavior of the samples, and correlating the results with hundreds of millions of other analyzed malware artifacts. In less than 10 minutes AMP Threat Grid reports back and Tripwire Enterprise tags the file with the result. This enables Tripwire Enterprise customers to prioritize actions for changes on systems with threats identified by AMP Threat Grid and initiate workflow actions for quick remediation.

Tripwire Sandboxing 2

Not only does AMP Threat Grid analyze a broad range of objects, but those interested in an AMP Threat Grid subscription will also be provided with deep analytics capabilities wrapped with robust context. With over 350 behavioral indicators and a malware knowledge base sourced from around the globe, AMP Threat Grid provides more accurate, context rich analytics into malware than ever before. Tripwire customers can register for their free demo here.

Tags: , , ,

How to Land Yourself in A Dream Career in Cybersecurity

Last week I had the wonderful honor of being a presenter in the Cisco Networking Academy Find Yourself in The Future Series. To date this series has attracted over 9000 live attendees, which is testament to the extremely high levels of interest in technology careers in this region as well as the extraordinary efforts of the APAC marketing team. One figure blew me away in particular: 70% of attendees are interested in pursuing careers in cybersecurity.

Cybersecurity is an incredibly exciting field. It draws in some of the most talented technologists and brainiacs and in many ways cybersecurity is similar to a game of chess. It’s about anticipating and staying ahead of your opponent. It’s also about learning to think like the bad guys except that he patterns are anything but predictable and then doing good. And, that feeling of contributing to the good of humankind is intensely gratifying.

Cybersecurity is such a diverse field and it intersects with just about every area of technology and even behavioral sciences. And, it’s this intersection that will enable students to pursue their dream careers in cybersecurity. Imagine a career in cybersecurity that intersects with medicine. Today people could die from hackers sending fatal doses to hospital drug pumps and you might have a vision for solving this life-threatening problem. In my work one of my goals is to provide our chidren a safe, digital playground. This combines my interest for education with privacy and digital safety.

On last week’s presentation I suggested students take the following steps to achieving their dream careers. And, it’s these very steps that have been major enablers in my career too.

  1. Find an area of cyber security that is particularly compelling and exciting to you. Or find the intersection of cybersecurity with another field and think of ways that you could change or influence the industry.
  2. Research that area on the web and learn as much as you can about it.
  3. Explore possibilities of being an intern in an organization that is pursuing innovative directions that coincide with your interests.
  4. Find a mentor. Mentors both help you grow your career as well as help you navigate a workplace. If you can find a way to help the person who is mentoring you, for example, research a new area, then you become very valuable to your mentor too.
  5. Finally, think about your career in a series of phases. What you might start out doing may be very different to what you do in 20 years from now. So think about companies that allow you to evolve and career paths that are flexible.

We live in an increasingly insecure digital world. The upside is that that cybersecurity will continue to be a much sought after skillset in the workforce. And, if I can help you pursue your dream career in cybersecurity, please reach out to me and if you missed the session you can view the recording on YouTube.

Tags: , ,

Hook, Line & Sinker: Catching Unsuspecting Users Off Guard

This post was authored by Earl Carter.

Attackers are constantly looking for ways to monetize their malicious activity. In many instances this involves targeting user data and accounts. Talos continues to see phishing attacks targeting customers of multiple high profile financial institutions.  In the past couple of months, we have observed phishing attacks against various financial customers including credit card companies, banks, credit unions, and insurance companies, as well as online businesses such as Paypal and Amazon. These phishing attacks have gone old-school in that they either attach an HTML document or include HTML data in the actual email to present the user with official looking pages that appear to be from the actual businesses being targeted.

Read More »

Tags: , , ,

Responding to Third Party Vulnerabilities

We are now more than one year on from the release of HeartBleed, the first major vulnerability disclosed in widely used third-party code. This is an excellent point in time to look back at what Cisco and our customers have achieved since, including how the Cisco Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) has evolved to meet this new type of threat. It’s also a key time for us to confirm and clarify our commitment to transparency in the vulnerability disclosure process.

Read More »

Tags: , , ,

Securing the Supply Chain is a Collaborative Effort

I’ve been thinking lately about how collaboration can work for the IT industry as we strive to address security. Cisco’s supply chain security capability focuses on three key exposures: taint, counterfeit and misuse of intellectual property.

Specifically, I’ve been thinking about how we might detect and mitigate against counterfeit ASICs. I have a hunch that working with the semiconductor industry, we can achieve this goal. Read More »

Tags: , ,