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LISP goes upstream into Open vSwitch

After a few months of work, I’m happy to announce Cisco has contributed the LISP protocol upstream into the Open vSwitch project. LISP is an open protocol developed by the IETF LISP Working Group. By getting LISP upstream into Open vSwitch, Cisco is continuing it’s tradition of enabling Open Standards by contributing to Open Source projects. What makes LISP interesting in the context of Open vSwitch is the fact it’s a pure L3 tunneling technology, the first in Open vSwitch. The current LISP code in Open vSwitch requires the use of static LISP tunnel endpoints. The instructions in the README file detail how to configure and use LISP tunnels in Open vSwitch. We have plans to remove the requirement for the static tunnels going forward. But for now, people who would like to experiment with LISP tunnels in Open vSwitch can use git to pull the latest master and give it a try. Feedback on the Open vSwitch dev mailing list is appreciated!

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Upcoming oVirt Workshop

oVirt

oVirt

The oVirt Project continues it’s momentum in the coming year with a new workshop being hosted in Sunnyvale, CA, at the NetApp campus January 22-24. The workshop is a great chance to learn more about the oVirt project. There will be presentations on both using and operating oVirt, as well as design discussion sessions around the code which makes up the oVirt project. This workshop is a great way to get involved with oVirt and learn from the core developers who are building the oVirt platform.

oVirt is a datacenter virtualization platform powered by libvirt and KVM. The latest release of oVirt is 3.1, which came out this past summer. Cisco is a board member of the oVirt project, and has been involved with the project since it’s launch at a workshop hosted by Cisco in the fall of 2011.

If you’re interested in virtualization, please register for the workshop. And after learning about oVirt at the workshop, become involved with the project and the oVirt community.

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WebRTC – Bringing Real Time Communications to the Web Natively

November 10, 2012 at 10:12 pm PST

Would you believe me if I say that, using just a few lines of JavaScript and HTML5 you could transform the Photo Booth app (available on Mac OSX) into a cool web based application, or overlay real-time audio and video onto your favorite WebGL based 3D game canvas, or build a plugin-less version of WebEx?

Through this blog, I attempt  to take you on a journey into the latest disruptive Web Standard called WebRTC. My goal in writing this blog, is to provide readers with some background information and dive a bit deeper into what WebRTC has to offer from the standards, and application developer perspective.

Before I jump in, let me introduce Cisco’s WebRTC  crew  -
Cullen Jennings, Ethan Hugg, Enda Mannion, Suhas Nandakumar (that’s me :)).

Background

The Web is evolving at a pace faster than ever before. The last few years has seen tremendous innovations in the Web Technologies, Applications, Infrastructure and Services. The advent of HTML5 has redefined the way Web Applications work by bringing in the capabilities & richness of native applications to the Web platform.

HTML5 technologies such as Web Workers, Browser-Native Media, Web Sockets and the like are redefining the roles and capabilities of the browser and the Web, and  creating experiences that rival native applications.

Building along similar lines, is the introduction of WebRTC/RTCWeb technological standards into the HTML5 standards basket, which is concerned with bringing rich real-time, interactive communications natively to the browsers.

Read More »

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Cisco’s Contributions to OpenStack

With the recent news about the Cisco Edition of OpenStack, I wanted to take some time to write about the contributions Cisco has done in the OpenStack community. Cisco’s engineers have been active in many areas of OpenStack. Below is a sample of some of the work being done by engineers at Cisco.

  • Cisco has been an active participant in the Quantum community since it’s creation. Cisco presented one of the original four blueprints which lead to the creation of Quantum at the Diablo Summit. The communities continued efforts have helped to ensure Quantum’s inclusion as a core project in the OpenStack Folsom release, and Cisco has been a key part of this work. The work Cisco has done here includes having multiple engineers on the Quantum core team doing code reviews, feature work, and bug fixes.
  • Work on integrating Quantum into Horizon was initially done by engineers from Cisco. This work has led to an increased effort to expose Quantum functionality into Horizon.
  • Cisco has contributed code and leadership around unit testing and integration. This is an increasingly important area to focus on. A project as large and distributed as OpenStack benefits highly from this type of infrastructure work.
  • Cisco has had engineers working on Nova in various capacities, with a focus on Quantum integration issues and bug fixes.

In addition to these OpenStack projects, Cisco has also contributed code around some Open Source projects which OpenStack makes use of.

  • Cisco worked with Nicira engineers to integrate support for Open vSwitch into libvirt. Cisco has continued to support and enhance this work going forward.
  • Cisco has contributed bug fixes, code reviews, and some feature work on Open vSwitch.

Cisco expects to continue and increase its involvement in both OpenStack and other Open Source projects. We look forward to collaborating with you in these vibrant communities going forward!

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Cisco Edition of OpenStack

On Friday, Cisco released the Cisco Edition of OpenStack. This contains all the core OpenStack services for Essex and Folsom, along with installation scripts and other open source components to make it easier to install and run in production. Cisco has been an active participant in OpenStack since the early days of the Quantum project. During the Diablo Summit in Santa Clara in April 2012, Cisco merged it’s own NaaS proposal with other vendor and provider blueprints to create the Quantum component of OpenStack. Over the last year and a half, we’ve been significant contributors to OpenStack in the following areas:

  • Quantum: Cisco Plugin, Linux Bridge Plugin, Extensions and L3 work
  • Horizon: Quantum integration
  • Nova: VIF drivers model
  • devstack

Where Can I Get the Cisco Edition of OpenStack Packages?

The Cisco Edition of OpenStack can be downloaded from this FTP site, and information on the packages can be found on this wiki. The packages are free and open source. The Cisco Edition of OpenStack is tested on Ubuntu 12.04 with the Cisco Nexus family of switches and Cisco UCS C Series servers. You do not need to run the Cisco Edition of OpenStack on Cisco hardware, but it is validated on this hardware configuration. The Cisco Quantum Plugin supports L2 segmentation using VLAN, and is formulated to work with both Open vSwitch as well as the Cisco Nexus sub-plugin. We are evaluating other versions of Linux (RHEL/CentOS) to be validated as the base Linux version.

Cisco Specific Additions

This edition uses Puppet (Puppet Labs) to automate the deployment of OpenStack services and in the Essex version we’ve included other software components required for running in a production setting. Work was done around service assurance. The compute monitoring stack consists of Nagios, Collectd, and Graphite. Compute performance and metric graphs have been integrated with the OpenStack Horizon dashboard. High availability is supported using the open source components ha-proxy, kickstartd and galera. As was mentioned earlier, all of the components of the Cisco Edition of OpenStack are Open Source components. We will release a similar HA version for Folsom shortly.

Cisco Edition of OpenStack: Take It For a Test Drive

We encourage you to download our OpenStack Edition and provide us with feedback. Cisco will have a strong presence at the Grizzly Summit, so please stop by our booth to get additional information on the Cisco Edition of OpenStack.

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