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The Exciting World of Charles Giancarlo

Change is the Mantra of IP TechnologyWhen Charles Giancarlo talks about the future, people pay attention. Giancarlo, Cisco’s Chief Development Officer, as well as president of Linksys, talks about the future of Internet technology this week on a VoD on News@Cisco. It’s a broad topic, but Giancarlo covers the ground easily by outlining the fascinating ways IP technology is developing. Much is in the offing, he says.”Internet technology is shaping the future of the desktop, the future of computing, the future of business communications and the future of personal entertainment. And not least, it will shape the future of our life experiences,” he says.IP allows just plain old telephone service to evolve to unified communications. “Phones aren’t just phones anymore. They are information and collaboration tools connected to the Internet, transmitting data, voice and video.”Consumer-oriented applications and services are fast evolving into business applications.In addition, standalone features like VoD, music-on-demand, social networks and blogs and becoming integrated into even more dynamic offerings. “What users are looking for today is more than one or another of these standalone services. They are looking for an integrated approach where an intelligent network can blend many of these services and more into rich and complete and compelling experiences.”Virtualization, where servers and applications can work in a non-dedicated manner and be provisioned quickly and cheaply, will change business operations for many, including service providers. With virtualization,”SPs can define a service in a data center,” Giancarlo says.”This virtualized architecture gives the SP the ability to roll out a service to all its customers literally overnight.”The data center will become one giant computer.”This will probably be the most significant change to happen in computers in 20 years and will set in motion all kinds of significant advances in the design of OSes, drivers and applications.” Wow. That’s a lot of change. But check out Giancarlo’s full vision on News@Cisco. There’s a lot more.

Evolving Next-Generation Architecture for Mobile Networks

Industry Tasks Force Announces A-IMSVerizon, along with a group of major telecom industry suppliers including Cisco, Lucent, Motorola, Nortel and Qualcomm took an important step forward to advance next-generation network architecture for wireless mobile telecommunications networks. The group announced an initiaitve to develop enhancements to an emerging architecture, IMS (IP Multimedia Subsystem).The new architecture, called A-IMS, for Advances to IMS, provides solutions to implement next-generation services in current networks, and creates a foundation for the roll-out of both SIP- and non-SIP-based services in future networks.IMS is generally accepted as a core component of virtually all next-generation, IP-based communications networks for SIP-based applications, and is designed to assure standardization of multi-media services across all of these interconnected networks.Dick Lynch, Executive Vice President and Chief Technical Officer at Verizon Wireless, said more work was needed to further develop IMS. “We applaud the visionaries who have done a great job developing IMS over the last few years,” Lynch said. “But as we approached implementation planning, it became apparent that there are some practical, real-world issues that need to be addressed if we are to transparently and completely deploy and maximize the use of this new architecture. To us, it is also important that it be built to support the bridging of the present non-IP reality as we transition to the future. As people look at what our task force has accomplished, I expect that they will see significant benefits, including embedding VoIP hooks into the lower levels of the stack and addressing security issues in a more systemic way. These are exciting advancements that are headed rapidly into our mainstream technology roadmap.”The group’s task force has developed a concept document and an architecture document that are being provided to industry leaders. The task force plans to make standards contributions in the near future.”The promise of IMS is extraordinary, for wireless service providers, as well as for all network providers,” said Charlie Giancarlo, Chief Development Officer, Cisco. “A-IMS enhances the opportunity for success for not only the network providers but also for companies in technology, infrastructure, handset manufacturing and service design and, most importantly, for the consumer.”Andrew Seybold, of the Andrew Seybold Group, endorsed the initiative. “I plan to actively support the adoption of A-IMS as a set of enhancements to IMS and MMD,” he wrote in Outlook 4Mobility. “I believe that the wired and wireless communities will also recognize the value of A-IMS and I encourage them support its adoption. Verizon and its vendors have identified problems and provided solutions in a manner that will result in an even better IP experience for all with multiple vendor solutions and a truly open set of standards.”

Evolving Next-Generation Architecture for Mobile Networks

Industry Tasks Force Announces A-IMSVerizon, along with a group of major telecom industry suppliers, including Cisco, Lucent, Motorola, Nortel and Qualcomm took an important step forward to advance next-generation network architecture for wireless mobile telecommunications networks. The group announced an initiaitve to develop enhancements to an emerging architecture, IMS (IP Multimedia Subsystem).The new architecture, called A-IMS, for Advances to IMS, provides solutions to implement next-generation services in current networks, and creates a foundation for the roll-out of both SIP- and non-SIP-based services in future networks.IMS is generally accepted as a core component of virtually all next-generation, IP-based communications networks for SIP-based applications, and is designed to assure standardization of multi-media services across all of these interconnected networks.Dick Lynch, Executive Vice President and Chief Technical Officer at Verizon Wireless, said more work was needed.”We applaud the visionaries who have done a great job developing IMS over the last few years,” Lynch said. “But as we approached implementation planning, it became apparent that there are some practical, real-world issues that need to be addressed if we are to transparently and completely deploy and maximize the use of this new architecture. To us, it is also important that it be built to support the bridging of the present non-IP reality as we transition to the future. As people look at what our task force has accomplished, I expect that they will see significant benefits, including embedding VoIP hooks into the lower levels of the stack and addressing security issues in a more systemic way. These are exciting advancements that are headed rapidly into our mainstream technology roadmap.”The group’s task force has developed a concept document and an architecture document that are being provided to industry leaders. The task force plans to make standards contributions in the near future.”The promise of IMS is extraordinary, for wireless service providers, as well as for all network providers,” said Charlie Giancarlo, Chief Development Officer, Cisco. “A-IMS enhances the opportunity for success for not only the network providers but also for companies in technology, infrastructure, handset manufacturing and service design and, most importantly, for the consumer.”Andrew Seybold, of the Andrew Seybold Group, endorsed the initiative. “I plan to actively support the adoption of A-IMS as a set of enhancements to IMS and MMD,” he wrote in Outlook 4Mobility. “I believe that the wired and wireless communities will also recognize the value of A-IMS and I encourage them support its adoption. Verizon and its vendors have identified problems and provided solutions in a manner that will result in an even better IP experience for all with multiple vendor solutions and a truly open set of standards.”

Chambers Cuts to the Chase With USA Today

Frank Talk on Important IssuesCisco President and CEO John Chambers gave some no nonsense responses to questions in a recent interview with USA Today. He explained Cisco’s point of view on net neutrality, on doing business with China and the company’s Scientific Atlanta strategy.USA Today: Since you’re in Washington, why don’t we start with the issue of net neutrality. Some Internet service providers want to stop treating all websites the same, and start charging extra fees for those who want to send content to users quickly. Much of the tech industry is backing legislation to prevent this. What’s Cisco’s stand?Chambers: Our country is running behind in broadband build-out. I’m interested in our country building out its infrastructure. For that to occur, I differ from some of my tech peers. My view is regulation is not the answer. If you don’t allow companies to build out with a high probability of a reasonable return, shareholders will punish them for building out.USA Today: What about the argument that we’d wind up with a two-tiered Internet and start-ups won’t have the same ability to reach consumers as wealthy companies such as Google?Chambers: I wouldn’t expect companies to pay for high-speed access - consumers will. If I want to watch a ballgame from multiple angles and perhaps telepresence across the country with my brother … to expect that free of charge is not realistic.USA Today: How about the consumer space? Cisco recently bought Scientific-Atlanta, a maker of cable set-top boxes for Time Warner and others. Is home networking panning out for you?Chambers: We’ve learned that entering a market you don’t understand by building products from scratch does not work. So we entered it by (buying) Linksys. We have over 50% retail market share. Combine that with Scientific-Atlanta.Video is hard. Only two players do it well, Motorola and Scientific-Atlanta.While we’d love to partner with (Motorola CEO) Ed Zander, it was too hard to move at the speed that was needed. So we bought Scientific-Atlanta.USA Today: Cisco equipment is used by countries such as China and Saudi Arabia, where the Internet is censored. What do you say about that?Chambers: We do not help any government modify our equipment or our code, not even our own. Whatever anyone does, they do off standard capabilities. It’s like anything you have - like the telephone. It can be used for good or bad.Make no mistake: The Chinese leadership understood that when they introduced the Internet, it would bring communications, capitalism and - my term - democracy over time. The benefits far outweigh any disadvantages.For the entire interview, go to USA Today.

Looking for a Cybersecurity Czar

Good Cybersleuths are Hard to Find One year ago, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff announced the establishment of the office of Assistant Secretary for Cyber Security and Telecommunications.Now the Business Software Alliance, whose members include Cisco Systems, Microsoft, Apple, Dell and Microsoft, has asked Chertoff to go ahead and appoint someone to fill the position.The office, as described by the Department of Homeland Security, seems to be designed to be a key player in security matters, responsbible for”identifying and assessing the vulnerability of critical telecommunications infrastructure and assets; providing timely, actionable and valuable threat information; and leading the national response to cyber and telecommunications attacks.”Robert Holleyman, President & CEO of the Business Software Alliance, said the group is ready to assist the office.”We are hopeful that you and the Administration will soon be able to nominate a qualified individual for the Assistant Secretary position,” Holleyman wrote to Chertoff.”Our industry remains fully committed to assisting the talented staff assembled at the National Cyber Security Division and look forward to furthering the public-private partnerships established to better protect our nation in both the cyber and physical worlds.” Jarrod Agen, a Homeland Security spokesman, said the department is “close to the final stages of the hiring process,” CNET reported.