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Moving to IPv6: Rebuilding the Heart of the Internet Without Missing a Beat

Within the coming decade, Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) will be key to enabling 50 billion connections among people, processes, data, and things in the Internet of Everything (IoE)But how we get there from here is not a simple matter.

I’m very pleased to invite Mark Townsley, Cisco Fellow and recognized industry expert on IP, to discuss this important transition in the second of our three-part blog series on IPv6. The first blog in Mark’s series was “Demystifying IPv6”.

townsley

Three years ago, I organized a conference in Paris where I thought it would be fascinating to bring together the original designers of IPv6 alongside the engineers who were finally deploying it at scale more than a decade later. During this discussion, Steve Deering, one of the “fathers” of IPv6 in the 1990s, was asked one of the most common questions about IPv6: Why wasn’t it designed for backward compatibility with IPv4? After all, wouldn’t it be easier to make the transition if the two versions could transparently coexist? Steve answered that the problem is not that IPv6 wasn’t designed to be backward-compatible—the real problem is that IPv4 wasn’t designed to be forward-compatible.

Steve was making the point that IPv4 was designed with a fixed address space. Given the number of computers connected to the Arpanet throughout the 1970s, this fixed-length address field seemed to be sufficient—at least for that version of IP. IP had been replaced before, and it seemed perfectly reasonable at the time that it might be replaced again. Read More »

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The Internet of Everything is the Internet of Today

If you were one of the more than 20,000 people who attended Cisco Live Orlando in person or one of the 250,000 who joined us online, you were able to see amazing examples of new ways the Internet of Everything (IoE) is connecting people, process, data, and things. People have asked me how long before they can see the value of IoE in action. Let me be clear: The Internet of Everything is not the Internet of tomorrow, it’s the Internet of today. Our most recent research shows that $1.2 trillion of value is “up for grabs” in calendar year 2013 alone.
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Internet of Everything: A Pivot Point in Technology — and Thinking

“You can’t manage what you can’t measure.” So said Dave Evans, Cisco’s chief futurist, in his keynote address at Cisco Live 2013.  I couldn’t agree more! As we usher in a new era of hyperconnectivity, we will see our environment in unprecedented ways, and then manage it like never before.

The trick is getting the relevant data to the right people at the correct time.

Cisco calls this transformation the Internet of Everything (IoE). With its explosion in connectivity from 10 billion things today to 50 billion in 2020, IoE promises a profound transformation that will enhance nearly all aspects of our lives.

But only if we do it right. And that requires changing the ways in which we think.

For IoE to be a true game changer, it will take much more than infusing every road, refrigerator, tire, and supermarket shelf with data-generating sensors. IoE could, for example, have a deep impact on water management. Today, 30 percent of fresh water is lost to leaking pipes. But a sensor in a pipe can only tell you that it’s losing water (and you may already have known that). The key is managing the information, tying it into control systems, and creating far-reaching, highly efficient processes for rerouting water or mobilizing maintenance resources. Read More »

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The Monetization of Me: Calculating the Return on Exposure

In a hyper-connected world, every consumer is continuously making a trade-off between the value of information and/or services they are receiving and the impact on privacy.  I believe this comparison amounts to a “Return on Exposure” — a value exchange in which the consumer must determine if the value they’re receiving is worth what they are giving up in privacy.

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Cisco Live Connected Buses: More Than Just a Ride

Cisco 819 ISR and HD IP video camera on board one of 34 connected buses at Cisco Live.

Cisco 819 ISR and HD IP video camera on board one of 34 connected buses at Cisco Live

Last week when Cisco Live attendees hopped on one of 34 connected shuttle buses in Orlando, they saw the Internet of Things (IoT) in action. The buses provided service for a record breaking 20,000 attendees traveling between 17 hotels and the Orange County Convention Center. 

Free Wi-Fi kept attendees securely connected from the time they left their hotel until they reached the convention center without losing connectivity. They simply used the same Cisco Live SSID and password on the buses as in the convention center. Greater productivity and an enhanced service for attendees made for a great experience…but, that’s not all.

Video cameras help keep passengers around the world safer and more connected and Cisco Live was no exception.  Each connected bus had an on-board Cisco HD IP video camera which sent a live feed to a monitor in the Cisco IoT Pavilion.

More than 50 touchscreen kiosks helped attendees in the convention center track important event information along with the bus schedule and route information.

Beyond keeping attendees connected, there was a lot going on under the hood…literally.   The Cisco 819 Integrated Services Router (ISR) did more than just provide passenger Wi-Fi. It enabled high speed voice, video and data communication 24/7 …everywhere!  The vibrations of a moving bus, a few spilled beverages, Florida’s high humidity and hot summer temps posed no challenge for the ruggedized 819 ISR that delivers Machine-to-Machine (M2M) applications in even the harshest conditions.

Back in the Cisco Connected Transportation booth, a monitor showed live GPS tracking of every bus in the fleet and visually tracked all buses and their location on a color coded interactive map.  On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) monitoring captured real-time vehicle telematics such as speed, tire pressure, RPM, engine temperature and fuel efficiency. This data was sent to the 819 ISR which transmitted the information to Davra Networks’ RuBan Suite for visual representation.

Wei Zou and Andy Manuel demonstrate Cisco's Connected Fleet Management solution at Cisco Live.

Wei Zou and Andy Manuel demonstrate Cisco’s Connected Fleet Management solution at Cisco Live.

Cisco Connected Fleet Management demo with video feed and Davra's RuBan software showing GPS location of Cisco Live connected buses and telematics info.

Cisco Connected Fleet demo with video feed from buses (left screen) and Davra RuBan software showing GPS location of Cisco Live connected buses and telematics data (right screen).

Additionally, areas around schools, playgrounds and other locations with reduced speed limits can be identified as “safety” areas using geofencing to send warnings or alerts or even take automatic action when a warning is triggered. Managers can be notified immediately when accidents occur or speed thresholds are exceeded.  On-board digital signs can display specific messages based on GPS location. The possibilities are nearly endless

The robust solution increases safety and fuel efficiency, reduces operating costs and enhances the passenger experience while helping transit operators comply with industry regulations and government mandates.  Cisco’s Connected Fleet Management solution is bringing the IoT to life!

Wishing all of you in the U.S. a safe and happy 4th of July!

Check out these great videos:

For more info on Cisco Connected Fleet Management visit: http://cs.co/9002ZHo2

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