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Summary: #SmartConnectedCity Series: A Smart City is a Safer City: Look to the Internet of Everything

Increasing safety used to mean finding budget for additional personnel, vehicles, equipment, radio networks, and other traditional IT. But thanks to an influx of connected technology, cities all over the world are reimagining what’s possible.

One question that is on the minds of many government leaders is: how can my community bring the LindsayH IoEsame amount of funding and resources, achieve effective and secure collaboration and information sharing, and leverage new technologies —  such as BYOD and Internet of Things (IoT), as part of a scalable architecture?

The answer is the Internet of Everything (IoE).

The bringing together of people, process, data, and things (like sensors) in new ways can create powerful change. Here are a few examples:

The Internet Of Everything at Work: A New Zealand Police officer is more efficient on the streets thanks to the Mobile Responder app.

New Zealand Police Officers Spend More Time in Community. About 6,000 New Zealand Police officers now have about 30 extra minutes each day to spend in the community thanks to an intuitive mobile app called Mobile Responder. Instead of having to drive to the station to access law-enforcement databases, the officers rely on the power of the Internet of Everything to request assistance and help fight crime.

Hurricane Sandy Responders Used Video for Situational Awareness. During Hurricane Sandy, traffic lights at a major intersection in Queens, New York, lost power. The resulting gridlock had become dangerous to residents trying to evacuate. A fire department chief put in an urgent request for police officers to direct traffic, but the request was buried among hundreds of others. However, through the use of IP video cameras relaying the severity of the situation in real-time, a fire chief was able to escalate the evacuation request.

Accelerate Threat Awareness and Response. Problems like a flooded sewer system or downed power line hurt the local economy. Now, utilities are finding out about safety problems sooner, using their existing network. A sensor in the sewer system, for example, can report a problem before residents do. And the dispatcher can find the closest person—from any agency—with the expertise to fix the problem.

To read more about how the Internet of Everything is creating safer cities at a lower cost, read the full article: #SmartConnectedCity Series: A Smart City is a Safer City: Look to the Internet of Everything.

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The Future of Cities is Here, and it’s Digital

What does your #CityofTomorrow look like? 

Over the past decades, broadband Internet access has been an important enabler of economic growth, social inclusion and improved government services. Now, the latest phase of the Internet—the Internet of Everything (IoE)—is transforming our lives in whole new ways.  The biggest impact of this change is happening in our cities.

At this year’s Cisco Live in San Francisco, there was a lot of discussion around the idea of digital cities. New ideas that combine smart phones, cloud applications, data processes with whole new classes of connected devices are reinventing city services and experiences. This is the Internet of Everything in action: transforming every aspect of a city, from utilities to public safety to transportation.

There are many examples today. The city of Santander in Spain has installed sensors to monitor traffic levels, noise pollution and lighting levels. Santander’s smart parking application has yielded an 80 percent reduction in downtown traffic congestion!  Cities around the world are using the Internet of Everything to reinvigorate urban centers just like the one in Santander, which can adapt to residents’ needs in real time.  These cities are discovering new opportunities for energy efficiency and seeing immediate returns on investments.

Another IoE twist is the Los Angeles police department project using data analytics to more rapidly spot crime in progress, via license plate readers on police cars. These readers, which are in use as officers conduct normal business, digitally scan tens of thousands of vehicles over the course of a single day. This means automatic notification of stolen vehicles to officers as they drive past on their routine patrol.

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Want to hear more? Cisco has teamed up with CNN to explore digital cities around the globe, just like Santander and L.A. The CNN “City of Tomorrow” looks at how cities are utilizing technology to improve our lives, diving into unique case studies with results happening today. Weekly editorials on CNN broadcast television and the City of Tomorrow hub showcase IoE examples happening around the world. Just as L.A. becomes a safer place to live, San Diego is able to increase the amount of available drinking water, and Seattle has created a completely green commercial building that leaves no carbon footprint. These are only a few examples of IoE in action; there are many more on the horizon. And you can learn about them all in this eight-week City of Tomorrow series. 

What you might not have realized is that the Internet of Everything is changing things in your city, too. How are you using the Internet of Everything today?

We want to know what examples of the Internet of Everything you see in your own City of Tomorrow – your neighborhood! Join the conversation online by tagging your photo and video examples with #InternetofEverything and #CityofTomorrow. How is the Internet of Everything changing your city? 

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Can YOU Benefit from the Internet of Things?

Did you know . . .

  • there are currently about 2 connected devices for every human being on the planet?
  • more than 99 percent of things in the physical world are still not connected to the Internet?
  • analysts are predicting the world will reach 50 billion connected devices by 2020?

All over the world, sensors, smart objects, and other devices are connecting through the reach and power of the Internet.   Manufacturing floors, energy grids, healthcare facilities, and transportation systems– are also being connected through the power of the Internet.

And they’re dynamically generating, analyzing, and communicating intelligence to increase operational efficiency, visibility and control, power new business models, and improve quality of life.

Read More »

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Summary – #SmartConnectedCity Series: Tackling City Challenges and Creating Opportunity with IoE and Smart+Connected Communities

What if…

…You have access to unlimited computing power at a reasonable price…

…Everything is connected to everything else…

Then…

Would you run cities the same way?

Would you live your life the same way?

I think you’ll agree that the answer is no.

The Internet has already radically changed the way most of us live our lives. If we take a look at the challenges facing cities today–overcrowding, traffic, areas of poverty, crime, limited access to healthcare, education, citizen services—we recognize the opportunity for the Internet—as it evolves—to radically change the way we address these challenges as well.

The growth and convergence of things and data as well as people and processes on the Internet–which we call The Internet of Everything (IoE)–is allowing us to look at the challenges our cities are facing in new ways and apply to the power of IoE to change, well, everything.

The Internet of Everything can empower cities to gather relevant data, analyze it, process it, share it and deliver it to the right people, places, and things to make stuff happen.

Whether it’s to change the stop lights to green as an ambulance is making its way to a hospital or automatically alert the public when the water supply has been compromised, a smart, connected city has more tools in its arsenal to address its most pressing challenges – and leverage new economic opportunities.

Read the full article: #SmartConnectedCity Series: Tackling City Challenges and Creating Opportunity with IoE and Smart+Connected Communities

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What the Exponential Power of the #InternetOfEverything Means for Smart Connected Cities

Barcelona, Amsterdam, Nice, London and New York are arguably some of the world’s most cosmopolitan cities. However, they have more than glamorous fashions, exquisite cuisine and vibrant nightlife in common. All are connecting things, such as cars and trash cans, to the Internet, making their cities work more efficiently.

As the Internet of Things continues to grow and connect things, and the explosion of big data, cloud and mobile devices change our landscape, it’s important to emphasize that a connected life is more than just smart appliances. As more things, people, and data become connected, the power of the Internet (essentially a network of networks) grows exponentially.

This is what we call the Internet of Everything (IoE) – the network effect of bringing together people, process, data and things—to create better social, environmental and economic outcomes in businesses and communities.

Recently, I wrote about how innovative cities, like Copenhagen, and the surrounding districts of Albertslund and Frederikssund are taking decisive action to reinvent themselves with the latest network infrastructure linked to the Internet.

Here’s a closer look at a few examples of the Internet of Everything in action in cities all over the world:

  • In Albertslund, work already has begun on the Danish Outdoor Light Lab (DOLL), which will become a showcase for smart lighting. Nearly 40 competing outdoor light solutions converged onto one open network will provide enormous potential to cut costs and consumption while improving public safety.Cisco_IoE Wim blog
  • In the Frederikssund district, just 25 miles from downtown Copenhagen, the greenfield City of Vinge has one of the greenest and most innovative master plans in Europe, setting the groundwork to be carbon neutral from the outset. Underpinning this goal are plans for an application-centric infrastructure that connects people, data, processes and things – the perfect example of the Internet of Everything.
  • And in the Copenhagen municipality itself, smart lighting, parking, water management, smart grids and more all to be converged onto one network, and powered by sensors everywhere, will improve sustainability, resiliency and overall livability.
  • Barcelona’s Born District, a bustling neighborhood of restaurants, shops and boutiques uses a customized network for reports on temperature, noise, humidity, particle-concentration and more, providing an overview of the city’s overall “livability.” The information is then relayed to city “situation” rooms, allowing officials to detect levels that are outside of set thresholds and improve on them.
  • In London and other parts of the UK, the Internet of Everything is causing city and government administrators to begin thinking long-term about energy consumption and their manufacturing industry. Facing a looming energy shortfall and poised to take its place as an international manufacturing hub, the UK is taking full advantage of the reach of the Internet of Everything as it works to solve infrastructure and economic challenges.

These examples are just the beginning of how with the Internet of Everything can change our world.

Thirty years ago, there were just 1,000 connections to the Internet throughout the world. Today, with the help of app-centric infrastructure, sensors and mobile devices, there are about 13 billion connections, and this is still just 1 percent of what’s possible. The economic opportunity to connect the unconnected totals $19 trillion, comprising $4.6 trillion for the public sector, two-thirds of which can be realized by cities.

In 2020, we expect 50 billion things to be connected to the Internet, which will still be scratching the surface of what’s possible.

We know that data is doubling every two years, and according to IDC the digital universe will expand to 44 zettabytes, or 44 trillion gigabytes, annually by 2020. That’s even more staggering when you consider that today 90 percent of data is dark – it is only viewed once or not at all.

However, this explosion of data and apps – when properly optimized – presents unprecedented opportunities to better manage resources and improve quality of life. By embracing the Internet of Everything, cities across the globe can are lead the way toward a more sustainable world. Will your city be next?

Be sure to follow @CiscoIoE and join the conversation, #InternetOfEverything.

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