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Chicago is Host City for 2014 Internet of Things World Forum!

IoT_logo_2linesThis week, Cisco is hosting over 70 companies and organizations for a second annual in-person Steering Committee meeting to plan the second  Internet of Things World Forum (IoTWF).   The goal of the Steering Committee is to shape the eventual Forum’s agenda and ensure it addresses top market opportunities and challenges that will influence global, political and environmental issues.  

The committee itself consists of thought leaders from business, universities, and governments from across these 70 companies and groups.  It is further broken out into 12 horizontal and vertical working groups who will be meeting as a group this week and who will continue to meet at a set cadence over the next six months in lead-up to the second IoTWF.

The overall goal of the IoTWF – and why Cisco started it in the first place -- is address topics that will improve the lives of citizens and businesses across manufacturing, energy, health, education, innovation, transportation, retail and job creation and also address the gaps and challenges of IoT standards, security, GTM, and architecture. The Internet of Things is happening now, but we need to ensure we bring together those who will be shaping it’s evolution.

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My #InternetofEverything Perspective: Driving Smarter with Technology and UPS

Dave Barnes, CIO of UPS, shares his perspective on the Internet of Everything.

The Internet of Everything has transformed the operations of UPS, the world’s largest package delivery company and a leading global provider of specialized transportation and logistics services. For starters, the Internet enables UPS to help businesses everywhere deliver on the promise of e-commerce. UPS connects its customers to their customers in ways that improve global supply chains – and at the same time, allows customers to track their packages as they zip their way through UPS’s logistics network.

Cisco_UPS_Ioe Perspective

The Internet also helps UPS optimize its operations: As customers go online to schedule their pickup, UPS computers begin mapping the best way to move this incoming wave of packages – even before they’ve physically entered the UPS system. Being wired into the world enables UPS to deliver more than 16 million packages each day – and 4 billion packages a year – for nearly 9 million customers in more than 220 countries and territories.

Being wired also helps UPS drive smarter. To reduce the time –and fuel – needed to deliver those 4 billion packages, UPS has pioneered a proprietary new mapping and optimization solution known as ORION. ORION – short for On-Road Integrated Optimization and Navigation network – reviews the package information, the delivery instructions given by customers and the wireless data feeds from the handheld computers used by UPS drivers. ORION processes this data using advanced routing algorithms and then provides each driver with the optimal path to make that day’s run. UPS’s network also wirelessly transmits real-time alerts and updates to drivers as they run their routes.

The Internet of Everything is also enabling UPS to offer customers a more personalized delivery experience. Today, UPS customers have the ability to schedule delivery windows, provide special handling instructions – and redirect a package to another location even when it’s on its way. Thanks to the Internet, UPS can give customers big and small the VIP treatment.

What is your #InternetofEverything perspective? Join the conversation today on Twitter.

 

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Ask The #InternetOfEverything Futurist: “In the Future, Will Clothes be Delivered to your Dressing Room in Your Size?”

In my role as Cisco’s Chief Futurist, I get many questions about what the future holds and how new technology and emerging solutions will change our lives. Given the positive feedback and the volume of questions being submitted from the community around the first series, I’ve decided to do another series to answer questions from the education and tech community around the Internet of Everything (IoE). Be sure to check out the previous Ask the #InternetOfEverything Futurist blogs and videos about the advances of battery technology and the future of smartphones.

As a kid, I was fascinated by the popular cartoon “The Jetsons.” Set in a futurist space community called Orbit City, the Jetson family had it all: a flying car, a household robot and a machine that helped members of the family get dressed.

Today, the technology the Jetsons used to live their life in the sky doesn’t seem too far-fetched. In fact, I’ve previously written about how close we are to seeing flying cars become a reality. We’ve also seen how the growth of the Internet of Everything (IoE) is connecting more and more people, data, things and processes – leading to a plethora of robots to clean your kitchen floors and an influx of connected things built to make our lives easier. A Cisco-powered infrastructure is what’s driving this the transition to an Internet of Everything world.

There is tremendous development in Jetsonian retail options. Online shopping via mobile devices, digital dressing room mirrors and a host of ready-to-wear connected devices (wearables) are changing how we shop and what we choose to buy. In one “Jetsons” episode, Jane and Judy Jetson use a “dress selector projection machine” to find an outfit to wear. Similar to what the creators of the Jetson’s predicted, we just beginning to see an iteration of this type of technology bring the runway to your dressing room or clothes closet. However, will this type of business model actually work?

In this Ask the #InternetOfEverything Futurist post, I’ll answer a question from Lauren Malhoit (@malhoit) a Cisco Champion, that points to this type of retail and fashion evolution. Lauren asks:

Question: “A recent Fast Company article mentions a retail business model where clothes are essentially delivered to you in the dressing room in your size. Do you think a model like this would work?”

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An Eye to the Future of Mobility: Wearables & Health Care

The explosive growth of the Internet of Everything (IoE) is driving a sweeping wave of transformation across our world. And the health care industry is among the many industries that are feeling its profound impact.

Already, health care practitioners are embracing such IoE-related trends as the surge in mobile devices and the cutting-edge advances in Big Data analytics. An ever-expanding multitude of applications are connecting mobile users (and patients!) in startling new ways. And many health organizations are adopting BYOD and deploying any-to-any connections, which link hospitals across the globe. The rising influx of smart watches and wearable technology that track personal health data also show great promise.

Overall, emerging mobile solutions can have a tremendous impact on the future of health care as they enable increased connectivity and a much deeper dimension and accessibility to key health insights.

In his book, The Human Face of Big Data, Rick Smolan, the renowned photojournalist and author, explores the interrelations among mobility, Big Data and health care. Together, he argues, they are transforming what it means to be connected. For example, wearables are already entering the mobile consumer landscape, where they are complimenting smartphones and tablets. But in the health care industry, wearables have tremendous practical potential. Electronic tattoos, Bluetooth-enabled dental implants, and a myriad of sensors that track our vital signs are changing how, when, and where we receive health care.

MobilizeMag: Healthcare and Mobility and how New Advancements Lead to Better Patient Care from Cisco Business Insights

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Analytics at the Edge: Where the Network Becomes the Database

In 1984, John Gage of Sun Microsystems coined the phrase “the network is the computer” as computing functions started to become increasingly distributed across the network. Today, boundaries that once separated individual computers have disappeared and application processing is enabled—and managed—by the network. We are now at the forefront of a new market transition, as eloquently explained by Rick van der Lans in his paper, “The Network Is the Database.”

The network is indeed becoming the database. Big Data and the related approach to database management are moving away from a centralized data warehouse model and literally starting to flow across the network. We are virtualizing data management by leaving data in the network, instead of copying it into a data center. Data stays in motion wherever and whenever it’s needed across the network, instead of being at rest.

What does this mean for business value? A distributed—and virtualized—data management approach solves the three major issues of Big Data: volume, variety, and velocity.

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