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#DigitalTransformation Fueling the Need for Workforce Transformation

Digital disruption is transforming virtually every role in every industry. Every day I see how the proliferation of online, mobile, and social interactions has created the need for completely new marketing strategies—and completely new skillsets for marketing professionals. We can see this same disruption across industries, as the Internet of Everything (IoE) creates fundamental transformation through the networked connection of people, process, data, and things.

For example, we recently published a new report that shows a global oil and gas (O&G) industry awash with disruption, and primed for digital transformation. Low oil prices have upended the sector, spurring an urgent rethinking of strategy by oil and gas executives—and accelerating the adoption of IoE.

This disruption is one of many factors impacting the oil and gas workforce today—from field workers all the way to the executive suite. Not only will new skills be required in an industry transformed by IoE, but new digital processes will also be needed to transfer knowledge, collaborate to solve problems in real time, and capture insights from a torrent of digital data.

To become agile enough to compete in the IoE Era, the oil and gas workforce must possess a mix of technical skills, industry knowledge, and business acumen. With talent shortages due to massive numbers of professionals retiring over the next few years—and a lack of necessary digital skills among those who remain— O&G firms need to make bold moves to transform their workforce strategy.

  1. Extend the reach of existing expertise –Video-based collaboration can help bridge the expected talent gap by making the most of professional expertise that is spread too thin, as well as providing ongoing training throughout the organization. Video and web collaboration can effectively bring remote experts to any location, without the need for travel. For example, Saipem, an Italian oilfield services company, has employed high-definition video conferencing to cut travel costs, boost productivity, and provide subject-matter expertise throughout the company and with partners.

Real-time collaboration tools are increasingly important for far-flung oil and gas organizations.

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The Internet of Everything and Making the Digital Transformation: The Value of the Cisco Partner Ecosystem

Partners are a big part of Cisco’s Internet of Everything (IoE) strategy. Over the last few years, we have attracted an impressive ecosystem of world-class partners. Cisco is working with this ecosystem to help countries, cities, industries. and businesses around the globe take the first steps toward becoming digital to capitalize on the value of the Internet of Everything . This week at Cisco’s Partner Summit event in Montreal, there is a lot of energy around the IoE and Cisco’s IoE Digital Platform – an end-to-end solution architecture that makes it easier for our customers to make the digital transformation.

Cisco’s Digital Platform provides our partners with an open, scalable, secure, and manageable environment for integrating their capabilities into our solutions and creates a foundation for global and local partners to meet specific customer needs. Read More »

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The Internet of Things: What Does It Take to Make the Internet of Everything Real?

I recently delivered a keynote address called “The Internet of Things: What Does It Take to Make the Internet of Everything Real?” at the IoT Global Innovation Forum in Dallas.

I talked about the important linkage between the Internet of Things (IoT) and the next wave of the Internet — the Internet of Everything (IoE). For the uninitiated, the Internet of Things is the networked connection of physical objects. The Internet of Everything is the networked connection of those physical objects along with people, data, and process. Read More »

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IoE-Powered Business Transformation Boosts Agility and Efficiency for Oil and Gas Companies

This week I’m attending CERAWeek, the premier international gathering of energy industry leaders, experts, government officials, policymakers, and innovators. While this is the 34th annual CERAWeek conference, the mood is definitely not “business as usual.” The disruption and uncertainty created by plunging oil prices and shifting market dynamics has created the urgency throughout the industry to rethink strategies and adopt connected technologies to spur operational efficiencies.

But disruption can also create opportunity. Forward-thinking oil and gas (O&G) firms see today’s turbulent market as an opportunity to gain competitive advantage by harnessing new technologies. For example, in the Eagle Ford region in North America, improved drilling technologies are now enabling oil rigs to produce 18 times more efficiently than in 2008, and 65 percent more efficiently than in 2013.

A new study by Cisco highlights the opportunity to achieve even greater efficiencies through transformed business models and digital technologies powered by the Internet of Everything (IoE)—the networked connection of people process, data, and things.

With IoE, oil and gas firms have the opportunity to make IT services a commodity in the business, creating the potential for dramatic cost reduction and improved operational efficiency. The illustration below shows several ways O&G operations can benefit from connected technologies. To achieve these benefits, however, they will need to bring together both the IT and the operational technology (OT) sides of the business. Our survey indicates that oil and gas firms have a long way to go in breaking down the barriers between IT and OT. In fact, only 41 percent of respondents “completely” or “somewhat” agreed that their firms’ IT and OT strategies are aligned.


Source: Cisco, 2015

Here are some examples of how IT-OT convergence can impact the areas of data, collaboration, and cybersecurity: Read More »

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The Internet of Everything Will Help Solve Problems That Lead To Recalls

Product recalls can be a headache for customers and consumers, but a financial nightmare for manufacturers.

Just look at the auto industry. An air-bag recall will cost one manufacture up to $235 million. While a gas pedal problem will hit another manufacture with upwards of $2 billion. Yes, billion.

But recalls aren’t isolated to the auto industry. Food. Toys. Tech. Virtually no industry goes untouched.

And it’s not just the size of a recall that matters. It’s the damage to your brand’s reputation. Plus, recalling a product is more complex than ever.

Here’s why. Read More »

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