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Clinicians using tablets DO deliver better care

Oh, how I wish tablets were around when I was providing patient care as a Registered Nurse on a busy surgical floor! I had a legion of patients, and masses of information to find and remember ‘in the moment.’ It seemed like I could never find the person or the equipment I needed fast enough.

Sometimes, the most practical option was to take pen to paper (or to my scrubs) to jot down a note, and then go find the information I needed in a chart, the EHR, or reference once I got back to the nurses station. Could I have delivered more timely, efficient and safer care if I had access to the information and data I needed at the patient’s bedside? You bet I could, and here’s how!

Tablets!

Tablets provide information access at one’s fingertips – especially at the patient bedside – helping doctors and nurses to render quick, safe and sometimes lifesaving care. This is echoed in Institute of Medicine (IOM) reports calling for direct care providers to have quick access to electronic references. Moreover, up to 70% of sentinel events in healthcare are caused by poor communications, according to a Joint Commission study (1995-2006). Given these findings, tablets offer a new and improved way to ensure patient safety because up-to-the-minute information and immediate communication is readily available where and when needed.

Tablets help save time by increasing mobility and productivity, reducing errors and keeping information readily accessible within the clinician’s reach.

Come on clinicians … no mater if you are a doctor, nurse, respiratory therapist, case manager, educator or another team member … surely you can think of all kinds of ways tablets could enable you to have the information you need when you need it. You and your patients will be all the happier and satisfied for it.

I quickly came up with a short list of ways that tablets, one of several mobile devices, can make a difference for patient care delivery:

  1. Workflow efficiencies by having access to information and data at the point of care
  2. Real-time communication amongst team members while in different locations
  3. Video consultations
  4. Patient education
  5. BCMA and real-time drug interaction checking … possibility for a real-time pharmacy consult at the patient’s bedside via voice or video conferencing
  6. Clinician satisfaction

My questions to you: Have you used a tablet to deliver patient care? If so, what has been your experience – is the tablet adding real value, or is it just “another toy”?

Let us know what you think!

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Future of the Emergency Department Part II: Views from Australia & New Zealand

Cisco asked a series of medical, design and technology experts about their views on the future of the Emergency Department as well as their insights into how effective communications and technology impacts the delivery of health services.  Take a look at the first part of The Future of the Emergency Department, if you missed it.

In this video, the speakers talk more about the importance of effective communications and technology within the Emergency Department.

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BYOD! What do you bring to the party?

October 4, 2011 at 9:43 am PST

Historically Healthcare has the reputation of being behind the technology curve, however the next-generation worker is now driving the demand for the Bring Your Own Device business model.

“What? That’s crazy talk! How do I maintain a controlled secure environment?” Exclaims the IT Manager.

This new age of social intelligence and the evolution of social networks and mobility bring the expectation of free choice among the work force. Workers are putting the pressure on organizations for interoperability between the enterprise network and the devices of their choosing.

Today the average person on the planet has 1.8 devices on today’s networks connecting over 13 billion devices in total.  By the year 2015 that number is expected to  rise to 25 billion equating to 3.47 devices per person. Read More »

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Beyond Meaningful Use… I Have a New Meaningful Use EMR, Now What?

After implementing electronic health records and operating on meaningful use, you may ask yourself – ‘now what’?

Now that your hospital or medical practice has an EMR, you are in a unique situation to utilize this resource for several other research capabilities beyond quality reporting. EMRs provide an outlet to access rich clinical data for research use, along with several other secondary uses. They can provide a platform for clinical recruitment, along with recently being recommended to use to document extreme situations, evaluating devices and drugs to provide early information helping to identify side effects that may have been missed during clinical trials.

What are additional secondary uses for EMRs that you have seen in your medical practice places and hospitals? Please share below and feel free to read more on this topic.

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Future of the Emergency Department: Views from Australia & New Zealand – Part I

Welcome to the first in a series of posts from the Cisco Australia and New Zealand (ANZ) healthcare team.

We’ll be providing regular news and insights from the region covering healthcare issues as well as the role of technology in supporting them.

This is the first of a two part video series on the future of the emergency department.

At a Digital Hospital Design conference hosted by Health Informatics Society of Australia (HISA) and chaired by Brendan Lovelock, head of the healthcare practice for Cisco ANZ,  industry spokespeople and medical specialists shared their views on how they envisaged the emergency department in the future.  Watch our video summary on what they said.

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