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Telehealth In Action: Remote Care for Veterans

February 20, 2012 at 5:11 am PST

The victim of a gunshot wound to the back of the head, Joseph “Jay” Briseno Jr. came home from his 2003 tour of duty in Iraq to an entirely different life—one that requires extensive ongoing care.

To make necessary healthcare services more accessible to Jay, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Washington, D.C. (DCVAMC) worked with Cisco TelePresence to tailor a telehealth solution specifically to Jay’s needs. Jay can communicate with his doctors through the telehealth device installed in his family home, 30 miles away from the hospital, and avoid the ambulance ride he would otherwise have to take every time he had an appointment.

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Is Your Network Ready for a Mobile Workforce?

February 17, 2012 at 8:49 am PST

Ready or not, governments, healthcare providers, and schools are going mobile. If your workforce isn’t mobile yet, it soon will be: by 2013, 80 percent of businesses will support a mobile workforce (one that specifically relies on tablet technology), according to Gartner.

As I mentioned before, mobile employees will depend on telepresence and video collaboration tools to optimize their work experiences: these technologies do a wonderful job of filling the gap in personal interaction that can occur when an entire office works outside of the actual office.

But telepresence and video are only as good as the networks that support them.

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Innovation in Government? Collaborative Research is Critical to Fuel Breakthroughs

This week I had the opportunity to meet with a research group from the University of Tokyo visiting California to explore the role of technology for intelligent cities of the future.   I prepared for this meeting with a discussion with colleage Dr. Norm Jacknis concerning his collaboration with government leaders and university researchers who are delving deeply into the impact of the Internet on government, politics, and society. 

Three takeaways were clear from these conversations:

1. Critical importance of collaborative research across expertise domains, geographies, and public and private sectors

2. Capability to harness the explosion of information or big data deluge that is being fueled by mobile devices connected to the intelligent network

3. An optimistic point of view about potential for research applications, and I’m an optimist!

Next month, Cisco is hosting a live webcast with Dr. Martin Chalfie, 2008 Nobel Prize Laureate in Chemistry Fueling Innovation:  How Research is Really Done (February 29, 2012 at 9:00 am Pacific Time / 12:00 pm Eastern Time). 

This webcast will explore how the fruits of basic research are critical to fueling applications. Dr. Chalfie will give examples from his own research developing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a biological marker, as well as from work by others, to demonstrate that the application of basic research into fundamental problems in biology is important for its own sake and, fuels the development of various new applications.

While research is typically focused on one industry, great discoveries generally provide value for multiple industries. 

Dr. Chalfie is a Professor of Biological Sciences and former chair of the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University. In 2008 he shared the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Osamu Shimomura and Roger Tsien for his introduction of GFP as a biological marker.

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Why do we need an IPv6 certification process?

February 14, 2012 at 1:22 pm PST

To answer that question first we need to look at the significance the current IP layer has in our day to day lives. Beyond that we need to, for lack of better words, “follow the money” that these IP based applications, services and infrastructure support. Stability of IP based communication is something we may take for granted but what would happen if that stable IPv4 layer was replaced with a not so stable upgrade? My home network connection goes out, kind of irritating but in the big picture I will probably forget it… the first time. Service Providers realize that if they cannot provide you with a stable service you may not be a happy customer, which may open the door for you to look elsewhere. Beyond that, the loss of IP based communication in many industries is seen as a loss of hundreds of thousands of dollars per second both in revenue generation and loss of opportunity. The point is, much of the world economy relies on a stable network at all times.

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With Proper Set Up, Telepresence Need Not Pose Security Concern

February 14, 2012 at 11:36 am PST

In October, we wrote about the federal government’s move toward installing video and telepresence capabilities on mobile devices to improve communication, especially for law enforcement and defense purposes. With mobile telepresence, the government can enhance collaboration and response time during critical events.

A recent New York Times article reminds us, however, that to safely realize all of the benefits of telepresence, the government—or any organization—needs to ensure proper implementation of the video technology. Obviously, security concerns multiply when numerous mobile devices attach to a telepresence network.

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