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How IoE Helps the Navy Connect the Open Ocean

The Internet of Everything will have far-reaching effects in a multitude of industries over the next few years. There will be an estimated 50 billion devices and objects connected to the internet by 2020. The movement toward an increasingly connected world is already transforming operations in the retail, finance and healthcare industries. The government is also seeking ways to harness the potential benefits of IoE, and one sector that anticipates gaining significant operational benefits from IoE is defense.

My colleague Cindy DeCarlo gave an excellent overview of how IoE is facilitating the vision of net-centric warfare. Mike Hodge further highlighted this transformation, emphasizing the benefits IoE can bring specifically to new smart and connected bases around the world. Today, I want to dig a little deeper and call attention to one branch of the military that is taking advantage of IoE to operate more efficiently and increase operational success in multiple areas: the Navy.

IoE enables the Navy to use technology to increase automation, improve multi-tasking, reduce workload and enhance effectiveness in four main areas: Read More »

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#WednesdayWalkabout Series: Health Tech, Coming Soon to a Location Near You

Digital Health Wave

Here we are, now in the digital age. Blah blah, you know that already. But while we all sit around with our smart phones, shopping, socializing, working, and living in the digital world; the reality is that we’ve really only started to scratch the surface. And even though technology has seemingly permeated everything in our lives, it is only beginning to touch how we manage health and wellness.

Yes, it’s fun and trendy to track your steps or your heart rate with wearables. But this is just a small glimpse into the possibilities of how we collect and share health data to improve patient care at greater speed and scale. Movements like the Internet of Everything have been kick-starting the advancement of digital health. However, there’s still disconnect between technology and the delivery of innovative healthcare. And the reality is, the majority of those in the health industry haven’t quite caught up. So the question remains, how do health and wellness dive in to the deep end of the digital movement?

Health, Wellness, and Rock & Roll

In today’s post, our digital citizen is also a rock star and heart patient.

device image (1)The alarm sounds at 8 am and it’s time to wake up. But it’s not the alarm clock that’s going off; it’s the notification of an issue in our citizen’s implantable cardioverter-defribillator (ICD). A device implantable inside the body capable of correcting most life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Without fully understanding whether to panic or accept it as a normal part of life with this new accessory, the answers were working themselves out behind the scenes, streaming real-time information on the patient’s well being. First, a notice was sent to the device manufacturer. This then triggered an alert to the health provider and prompted a call to the patient. Within an hour of being awakened by the unnerving sound coming from our citizen’s own chest, the cause had been identified, shared with the care provider, and a next-day appointment had been scheduled for follow up.

Healthcare professionals normally rely on patients to confess how they’re feeling. However, with the possibilities enabled by crossing into the digital health realm, doctors will soon know how their patients are feeling, and possibly even why, before patients can walk into the exam room. In this case, proactively monitoring and solving for problems has allowed our citizen to return to normal life. Our citizen is as active as ever and still rocking on strong.


What if a specialist is needed, what then? More often than not, vast distances separate physicians, specialists, and patients in all corners of the globe. If our citizen had lived in Ontario, Canada, where telemedicine initiatives have helped patients save almost 200 million miles of travel per year, access to a specialist would have been a few keystrokes away. By providing tools that allow healthcare providers to easily communicate with one another and with their patients, caregivers can use the network to deliver wellness through video conferencing with patients, share data amongst one another, and support educational events or meetings over a distance.

And what about access to the remote areas of the world? There are renowned programs like the UVA Center for Telehealth. As well as serving patients throughout Virginia, it has expanded its programs to the medically underserved in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, and other international destinations providing basic medical care and specialty services from psychiatry, to pediatric neurology, and genetics.

But why stop there? Technology is becoming more and more accessible. We should be planning for the day when all patients receive and all professionals provide the right care, at the right time, in whatever location is most convenient; the move to truly patient-centric care.

Next Stop

Stay tuned for next Wednesday’s post to discover more information about learning without limits. And be sure to check back each week as we explore new themes, challenges, and observations.


Additionally, you can click here and register now to get your questions answered on how to become the next digital community.

Finally, we invite you to be a part of the conversation by using the hashtag #WednesdayWalkabout and by following @CiscoGovt on Twitter. For more information and additional examples, visit our Smart+Connected Communities page and our Government page on Enjoy the Wednesday walkabout!

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Video Interpretation Solutions Help Ensure Equality in the Justice System

While I was thinking about the topic of my second post in the court series leading up to the CTC conference in September, I came across an interesting news article. The state of California just announced that it will now provide court interpreters for free in all court cases. In the past, the state – along with many others – has only provided interpretation services in criminal cases. However, ensuring that everyone understands what is going on in the courtroom, no matter the case, is critical to making sure justice is dispensed fairly, efficiently and accurately. This means that court interpretation services are a crucial part of the justice system.

While this move by California is great, it is a bit behind the times. Back in 2010, the Department of Justice issued guidance on the issue of interpreters within the judicial system, noting that a particular concern was, “limiting the types of proceedings for which qualified interpreter services are provided by the court.” The letter went on to state: “Some courts only provide competent interpreter assistance in limited categories of cases, such as in criminal, termination of parental rights, or domestic violence proceedings. DOJ, however, views access to all court proceedings as critical.” This means that all states have had five years to expand their court translation services to cover all types of cases, in accordance with the Department of Justice’s standards.

However, states have been slow to take on this expansion, largely due to the high costs. California, for example, has the nation’s largest court system, spread out across a huge state. They also have about seven million residents with limited English proficiency, who speak over 200 different languages. The cost to provide translators in those locations for these residents is huge; in 2010, California spent nearly $93 million on court interpretation services. So in order to reconcile the challenge of fixed budgets with the increased demand for interpreters, state and local governments need to rethink their manual processes for deploying these services and look toward technology instead.

One major way to reduce the cost of providing interpreters and ensure that all citizens participate in a fair and balanced judicial process is using video services. To address the rising demand for interpreters and to help streamline court procedures, Cisco has developed a Connected Justice™ Video Interpretation solution (CJVI). CJVI allows interpreters to virtually join court proceedings using the high-quality video and audio features of Cisco® Unified Communications Manager and Cisco TelePresence® end-points. Read More »

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#WednesdayWalkabout Series: Special Edition

We interrupt this program for a special message

This week we kicked off our presence at some exciting events to discuss ongoing issues facing city, country, public safety, and defense leaders across the globe.

We are at a unique point in the evolution of our world and industry. Each of us is becoming more reliant on digital technologies, unleashing new and exciting opportunities for change, yet creating an ever-growing critical need for heightened safety for communities and countries, and locked-down security for data and cyber networks.

Going digital at #dsei2015 and #SmartCitiesWeekDC

In this week’s special edition post, our digital citizen has had the unique opportunity to join important discussions at Defense and Security Equipment International (DSEI) and Smart Cities Week.

First, our citizen will touch down in London to visit DSEI and the joint Cisco and Intel booth (N10-150) that is anchoring the newly launched Communications Zone.


Our citizen’s first days at the show were a mix of discussions with customer delegations, strategic partners, and analyst groups that focused in on the secure communications and innovative technologies that underpin all public safety, national security, and defense operations at home and abroad. Our citizen is able to visit with partners like Forfusion to talk about mission-critical communications, in particular gaining key insight to the CTO’s unique perspective. Stopping by any of the Cisco plus partner demonstrations and theater sessions in the Communications Zone is gleaning awareness and understanding to digitally enabled defense network and communications capabilities.

A quick hop to the other side of the pond, and our digital citizen is now at the Washington DC hosted Smart Cities Week.

The Smart+Connected Communities conversation is attracting a lot of event goer traffic, showing the possibilities for end-to-end connectivity across city cyber and physical environments. Our citizen was able to stop for a quick (or not-so-quick) chat with a city manager, touching on the rapid change of community culture impacting the importance of local governments and city leaders in adopting technology strategies. Meaning that elected leaders really must begin to watch trends to remain relevant and to be reelected.  Also, in summary, with each year comes a new generation of voters that dramatically changes the conversation from “what if” to “why not.”  The millennial generation has grown up as a group of digital natives and has different expectations in terms of what’s possible and what is needed, pushing the boundaries of traditional government.

Public Safety session

Many of the conversation trends picked up on the show floor focused on the importance of how technology can enable better communication and collaboration with citizens to make communities and countries safer. Emphasizing, of course, how technology will not replace officers or military, but rather, enable agencies to more effectively use personnel where it’s needed most. In both cases, city and country leaders are discussing strategies for using innovative technologies to improve outcomes across safety and security, like reducing crime and minimizing danger when disaster strikes.

Capping off the week in London will bring you theater presentations on Connected Defense, Military at the Connected Edge, Cisco and Partner solution demos, and much more. And in Washington, D.C., Cisco’s Cliff Thomas will be telling the story of Barcelona’s digital transformation and talk about how technology convergence is driving digitzation that enables new efficiencies, revenue streams, and engages citizens in unique ways.

Next Stop

Stay tuned for next Wednesday’s post to discover more on human health and wellness in the digital world. And be sure to check back each week as we explore new themes, challenges and observations.

Series Image

Additionally, you can click here and register now to get answers to your questions on how to digitize public safety and security.

Finally, we invite you to be a part of the conversation by using the hashtag #WednesdayWalkabout and by following @CiscoGovt on Twitter. For more information and additional examples, visit our Smart+Connected Communities page and our Government page on Enjoy the Wednesday walkabout!

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Does Fast IT work in Government? It sure does: check out the case studies.

In my previous post, I explained how CIOs are reinventing the mission and role of the IT department in order to support the Digital Transformation of their organisation. And that adopting a Fast IT model is less about technology and more about progressive cultural and process changes.

But is this realistic for public sector organisations as well? It sure is.  In this post and 2 following ones, I’d like to share some of the outcomes from the Fast IT engagements done with 3 IT organisations in the government sector, a sector that often has the unfair reputation of being overly conservative. I’ll show that public sector CIOs are motivated to change the status quo and disrupt the current operating model to better serve the needs of the public administration, of citizens and of businesses. Naturally, the details are confidential, so I am using pseudo-names to preserve the anonymity of our customers:

  1. Central IT department of a Large International Government Institution: let’s call it “GovIT-A
  2. Central Government IT Service Provider in Eastern Europe (providing IT services to all ministries in the country): let’s call it “GovIT-B
  3. IT Department of one of the major German Government Institution in Germany: let’s call it “GovIT-C

In each engagement, we have used the same methodology (“Strategic Roadmap to Fast IT“) consisting of 3 phases:

  • Phase One – Focus on BUSINESS: Clearly identify and document the strategic drivers for IT from the business’ perspective (or ministries, or government agencies). Indeed, you can’t ambition to build Fast IT organisation if you haven’t clearly captured what’s holding you back (the main problem often being culture, organisation and processes), and put a remediation plan in place.
  • Phase Two – Focus on IT: Build the IT Value Map to demonstrate — visually – how IT is structured to deliver value and how success will be measured. Long report are read (sometimes) and then forgotten. But you shouldn’t underestimate the communication power of a large poster in every room of the IT department (and the business): this is how you create alignment in the long run.
  • Phase Three – Focus on ROADMAP: Using output from phases one and two, identify and prioritise the key programmes and projects – the Strategic IT Roadmap – that will deliver the biggest impact, enabling a successful execution of the IT Management Plan for this year, the next 3 years and beyond.

In this post series, I’ll illustrate the outcomes from the 3 phases, using 1 client for each phase. Let’s get started…

Case Study #1 – Focus on BUSINESS

When we first started talking with GovIT-A about 2 years, the previous CIO (technically-minded) had just been replaced, mainly due to the dissatisfaction of the client departments that he was providing services to. The new CIO (business-minded) was determined to avoid the errors of the past, and wanted to build a strong foundation, based on excellence in customer services. Cisco proposed to engage on a Strategic Roadmap to Fast IT, and we received the list of 8 key stakeholders *outside* of the IT department (the “customers”), as well as the list of 8 key stakeholders inside the IT department (the “providers”).

We started by interviewing the people outside of IT, to get their perspective on the quality of the IT services they were getting. We used COBIT5 as a way to structure all the information that we collected (advantage: COBIT5 was already used by the audit department as well). COBIT5 provides a list of 17 generic enterprise business drivers, of which we identified 8 as being crucial to the future success of GovIT-A:

  1. A culture of partnership for business and IT innovation. 
    GovIT-A had a major issue: the complete lack of trust between IT and business stakeholders. Fostering collaborative attitudes was absolutely crucial for Fast IT to become a reality one day. We looked at how to build multi-level partnerships and agree on roles and responsibilities to create common goals within a shared IT Capability Framework.
  2. Managed business change programs. 
    Quickly identifying and empowering “champions of change” (both in the business and in IT) was seen as key to accelerate the transformation to Fast IT. Innovation was to be supported by top management and coordinated through agile, virtual teams. We looked at how well the operational model supported an effective change management.
  3. User-orientated service culture.
    IT was focused on its technology stacks, not on the actual services delivered to the users. A move to service-orientation was a key step towards Fast IT. Monitoring KPIs and improving processes would support this. We confirmed what the IT department and LOBs were responsible for, and reviewed how we could cut the overall cost and complexity of IT processes.
  4. Agile responses to a demanding business environment.
    IT needed to be much more agile – responsibly meeting the needs of the business in terms of time to service, flexibility and interoperability. We reviewed flexibility and the layers of authorisation that got in the way of creating a responsive IT department.
  5. Financial transparency and value for money.
    The whole procurement paradigm of GovIT-A was incompatible with a move towards Fast IT. For example, each technology team (network, server, storage, etc.) was still ordering the equipment it needed, more or less independently from the others. This meant for example that it was impossible to order an integrated compute stack. Or to order Infrastructure as a Services (IaaS). The IT department was unable to tailor its services to meet the unique expectations of the different departments in terms of cost, security and flexibility etc. This lead to each departments trying to avoid GovIT-A as much as possible, and trying to do it themselves – dramatically increasing the share of IT spend outside of the GovIT-A (around 75%!).
  6. Managed Business Risk.
    Being a government institution, no compromise could be made around information availability. However, the security team was really seen as “Doctor No”, so departments would do anything they could to find workarounds. We established the need to balance – on a per-application basis – the business benefits with its cost and the security requirements.
  7. Operational and staff productivity.
    Many employees within GovIT-A expected IT to work the way they knew was possible. With mobility. From home. Video-enabled. We discussed with the IT team how to adopt a user-centric model, powered by technologies that drive collaboration and delivered in an environment of Continuous Service Improvement (CSI). We identified quick wins, such as BYOD, mobility and telepresence initiatives, with positive results for the end user.
  8. Skilled and motivated people.
    As the IT environment evolves, so must employee’s skills. Continuously. We looked at how to create a learning curriculum that was blended, easily accessible and collaborative. Proactive, forward-looking training would help them to take on new roles and adapt to the new technologies or processes that Fast IT brings. This is all too often the piece of the strategy that’s missing to IT roadmap.

Of course, these 8 strategic drivers are not something to we can solve over the matter of a few months. It takes at least 5-7 years, to gradually evolve the IT Department to Fast IT. Today, we are pleased to continue our ongoing collaboration with GovIT-A, and seeing initiatives and projects that are approved by management, implemented in the field, and gradually reaping their benefits.

Don’t hesitate to post your comments if you’d like to get more details on some particular aspects of our engagement with GovIT-A.

In my next posts, I’ll cover the work we did with 2 other government agencies:

  • Case Study 2 (“GovIT-B”): the focus of the post will be on the IT Value Map
  • Case Study 3 (“GovIT-C”): the focus of the post will be on the Strategic Roadmap to Fast IT.

Stay tuned!


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