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Cloud and Governments in the UK: Some Interesting Findings, Part 2

Cisco recently completed a project in the UK with an external research firm that had some interesting data points with regards to cloud and government organizations.  I previously commented on portions of this research on my personal blog, however there were some interesting findings that I thought I would share here. 

Perhaps the most intriguing juxtaposition found in the study is that 34% of government respondents think security concerns are misrepresented and over-emphasized, while security and privacy concerns are also seen as the biggest barrier to wider adoption of cloud in government (86%).  The next biggest concern was about the location of data (70%), showing that data sovereignty will continue to be a major issue for government agencies wanting to move into the cloud.  At a recent Public Sector CIO dialogue I attended in London, there was clear tension between the desire for agencies to use smaller, more local vendors, while desiring the confidence of going with a large, established IT player that may be more secure, but usually has multiple data centers in multiple countries. 

I have seen a lot of research lately about what type of cloud deployment model will be favored over the next 5 years.  Much of the research and analyst reporting is that the public cloud represents the best and most efficient cloud deployment model.  However, one single model does not take into account the vast array of regulation that government agencies must comply with, nor does it necessarily address their actual business needs.  Some really interesting data from Cisco’s recent study shows that, in five years time, the dominant cloud deployment is considered to be private cloud (46%), followed by hybrid cloud (22%), with public cloud and community cloud only garnering 8% and 6% respectively. 

This seems to suggest that perhaps some of the current wisdom in the market may not be directly addressing the realities that government customers may face.  What do you think?

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