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High Tech Policy

Normally I wouldn’t do this type of navel gazing, but I would relish some feedback on the power (or lack thereof) of corporate blogs. And, yes, I have read the BusinessWeek cover story. The reason I’m looking for some general feedback is that my team had an internal discussion on the efficacy and importance (or lack thereof) of blogs. I was arguing for, of course. I had a colleague arguing against.

“What’s the point?” this person asked. “It seems like make-work to have everybody on the team blog.”

“I can only do so many meetings and phone calls a day,” I replied, “but a blog can get an idea across to hundreds a day and since we are in the business of trying to influence public policy I think blogging is a natural.”

“They’re stupid,” said this person.

“In the time that you have just taken to (gripe) about blogging, you could have written a blog entry,” said I.

My boss directed a question to the blogging nay-sayer, “Have you ever read a blog?”

“No,” said this person.

“Ignorance is bliss,” I said under my breath.

So, please help me and my nay-saying colleague by giving me any feedback on the power (or lack thereof) of blogs in the corporate setting…especially if you have any thoughts around blogging on the public policy side. Thanks. And, happy blogging.

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1 Comments.


  1. John – of course a good blog works wonders for corporate policy. Best example is Kim Cameron leading Microsoft on its Damascene conversion from Hailstorm to Infocards, refining it along the way with willing help from many.Do I understand Cisco policy has now come down firmly and entirely against blogs? That would be a shame.

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