Cisco Logo


Enterprise Networks

As we navigate through the Developer contest, we’re often asked what is our target audience? Valid question, don’t you think? So, I thought it worthwhile to dedicate some blog space to it. The primary audience for the Think Inside the Box contest are many and include the network application developers, the vertical domain application experts, the Linux and Open Source programmers, IT network engineers, University students as also our traditional VARs and ISVs. Certainly the playground is fairly broad. However, some are perhaps at a natural advantage as they get the concept much more easily than others, possibly due to their background. For instance, ISVs who are exposed to Cisco routers and constantly deal with customers have a fundamental understanding of the problem space, and are probably in a better position to define a better solution to address it. University students and traditional application developers may be very good at what they do, but they may not have a true understanding of the branch problem statement and have to spend cycles to understand this. Our goal is to level the playing field. In that process, if we develop (no pun intended) a better relationship with the developer community and help them cross the chasm to understand the Network as a platform, we’ll give ourselves a pat on the back.With that objective, we’re going to enrich this site and other related ones to bring additional focus to the traditional application developers, the Linux programmers etc., and expose them to the branch concepts, the Integrated Service router in general and the AXP platform in particular. We’re also going to make some of the developer tools available well in advance, including VMware based AXP virtual blades that will help contest entrants and the community at large to start getting their feet wet.For this blog, I talked to Anurag Gurtu, our lead Technical Marketing Engineer to outline some of the basic concepts around the Cisco AXP and bring a developer’s perspective. Now, Anurag is a sharp guy. He went on to explain how application developers and Linux programmers can bring a sense of co-relation to actually developing some innovative ideas on the router. Enjoy!There’s more to come along these lines as we bring you more developer-centric readouts, with inputs from analysts, our existing ISV partners and perhaps even our customers. So, stay tuned. Also, if you see any interesting blogs outside of Cisco that mention this contest, or good comments around it, do give us a shout.Oh, do keep your comments coming in here too :-)

Comments Are Closed

  1. Return to Countries/Regions
  2. Return to Home
  1. All Enterprise Networks
  2. All Security
  3. Return to Home