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Cisco Blog > Inclusion and Diversity

Short Attention Span? Or Just American?

Sony’s US-specific informational video for its NEX camera runs 2:59. It’s set solely to music.  Sony’s video for the Japanese market runs 6:58 and has technical narration throughout.  That’s just the beginning of the differences.

Sayaka Katamura and Haruna Kawamoto did a nice informal analysis of the differences that Sony perceives when selling to the US and Japanese markets in a recent post on Ishmael’s Corner.  The takeaway? The importance of localizing storytelling.

Reading this article was particularly timely as my co-workers and I are planning an inclusion & diversity event for our Asia Pacific theatre.  We held a combination in-person and Telepresence video event in January that was well attended by our North American and European geographies.  Of course, that means that it was in the middle of the night for our APAC colleagues.  Ah, the joys of a global business. Read More »

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How technology is evolving the business card

The exchange of business cards is a long-standing tradition that spans all the way back to the 15th century when folks in China used to exchange “visiting cards” or “calling cards” – cards that visitors wrote their names, notes or messages. The cards were introduced in Europe in the 17th century during the reign of Louis XIV.

Bobbie Johnson, Technology reporter for BBC News, has written a thought-provoking article on the effect technology is having on business cards.

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Language as a Window into Human Nature

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Staying Relevant

It’s against human nature to react favorably to the disruption of process change. Continuous improvement means continuous change, and change takes people out of their comfort zone. How have you seen people react to changes in their work? The typical reaction is resistance. As Machiavelli pointed out in The Prince roughly 500 years ago, there is no constituency for innovation: “There is nothing more difficult to take in hand, more perilous to conduct, or more uncertain in its success, than to take the lead in the introduction of a new order of things.”

– Brad Power, Harvard Business Review Read More »

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How ‘OK’ took over the world

Did you know that the word ‘OK’ is one of the most frequently used and recognised words in the world? One reason for is success is the fact that almost every language has an O vowel, a K consonant, and an A vowel, so it is easily incorporated into a multitude of languages. Read More »