Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Data Center and Cloud

Cisco Unified Computing System: A Biography

April 15, 2009 at 12:00 pm PST

Silvano Gai, Tommi Salli, and Roger Andersson have pulled together a good book to tell you everything you every wanted to know about the Cisco UCS: Project California: a Data Center Virtualization Server -- UCS (Unified Computing System),” ISBN: 978-0-557-05739-9, Cisco System, April 2009.

Virtual Networking with the Cisco Nexus 1000V

April 15, 2009 at 12:00 pm PST

imageWe just posted an a new document to the website that provides further detail on virtual networking with the N1KV. A key part of the doc is a comparison of the existing VMW vSwitch vs the new VMW vDS and the N1KV. It gives you a better feel for how we can expand the role of server virtualization in the data center with more sophisticated networking capabilities.

The Inter-Cloud and internet analogies

David M. Smith of Gartner spent some time with me a few weeks ago exploring Cisco’s cloud computing vision. I walked him through a variety of concepts, such as private clouds, virtual private clouds and open clouds. We also spoke of the vision of an “Inter-Cloud”, a vision shared by most cloud enthusiasts here at Cisco, including our CTO, Padmasree Warrior. David had some excellent feedback, and I enjoyed the conversation very much.

Unfortunately, I think David came away from the conversation with a slight mis-interpretation of how we use the term Inter-Cloud. As he states in a post on his blog, “Life on the Inter-cloud”: Read More »

EnergyWise Development and Data Centers

A quick overview on some of the progress being made in San Jose on EnergyWise. As you will hear we are taking a staged approach as there is a lot of ground to cover. It’s too early for us to offer exact milestones but this interview will give you a sense of the scope we are considering in our development. As Matt Laherty often says, we are laser focused on “smart loads” at scale in the near term. This is close to our space and the technology we develop for smart loads will be directly extensible to “smart grids”. Keep in mind that from an energy monitoring standpoint, data centers are similar to any other room in the building. Energy control of course is a whole different ballgame and one we will be implementing into Cisco IT very carefully.This video was taken by Rich Miller who writes for Data Center Knowledge and has a great YouTube site that has a ton of content related to data centers and energy. The Green train keeps on rolling with energy and carbon being the first resource management areas. This was the hot topic for the show Rich and I attended in San Francisco in March where the video was taken. The GigaOm GreenNet show was well attended and… Read More »

Architecture of a Platform

In the last post I talked about the importance of designing a platform vs. a box and the benefits associated to that choice. Now I’d like to spend some time going into more of the architectural details that make the MDS box a platform. I’m going to try to keep the discussion as high level as possible, but at the end we are still a technology company, so I hope at least some of you will appreciate this “engineering” discussion.The architecture of an MDS Director can be simplified by listing the main three components involved in the packet switching operations: -- the port module (or linecard): the element delivering the forwarding functionalities for each packet received in an ingress port and transmitted to an egress port -- the crossbar (either on the supervisor or on the fabric module): the ‘N x N’ matrix providing connectivity between each port in each module -- the arbiter (on the supervisor module): the scheduler deciding which port should be using the crossbar to transmit trafficBased on these building blocks, the MDS Director switches deliver a centrally arbitrated, crossbar architecture, with frame forwarding logic distributed in each port module. A packet arrives in an ingress port, a forwarding decision is made by the port module, the arbiter schedules the packet transmission based on congestion, the crossbar switches the packet to the egress port. Read More »