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Cisco UCS: Customers Win

Two years ago Cisco entered the server market with the introduction of the Unified Computing System.  Our competitors met the move with skepticism, blank stares and questions around Cisco’s market strategy.  Our customers wondered what a networking company new about computing.  We didn’t let the naysayers or the doubters distract us.  We continued the hard work of innovation and communicating the architectural superiority of the Unified Computing System.  Soon customers and competitors began to take notice. Read More »

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They Were Wrong About UCS…What Else Are They Wrong About?

May 24, 2011 at 4:04 pm PST

As we near the 2nd year anniversary – July 20, 2009 -- when we first shipped the Cisco Unified Computing System, we’re having some fun looking at past milestones, sharing success stories, and putting to rest competitive FUD.

Many industry pundits thought Cisco was taking a big leap off a steep cliff when we introduced UCS.  Proving the naysayers wrong is always satisfying, so we offer this fun video entitled: “They said it couldn’t be done”– bad predictions throughout history. We hope you’ll enjoy this and see how Cisco’s Unified Computing System fits into that mix.

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Cisco UCS : There is a movement

May 24, 2011 at 10:49 am PST

Almost 2 years ago , we not only launched  a new product , but more importantly a new concept – We called it “unified computing ” and named the products Unified Computing Systems (UCS)
At that time , the media highlighted the fact that Cisco was entering the server market , and of course the incumbent providers were prompt to claim how fool we were
They said that” it couldn’t  be done” . But we insisted and even declared “There is a movement “
This was supported  by the fact that we have been hearing repetitively from our customers that working in silos (servers, network and storage) was not anymore efficient. That virtualization was getting real traction. That the demand and the appetite to reduce costs in IT organization were stronger than ever. Of course , from a marketing and communication points of view we wanted to believe that “the movement” was towards our Unified Computing Systems. So we created this video “There is  a movement” 

Since then we have been working very hard at Cisco and with a growing number of partners  to make this movement towards the Unified Computing Systems a reality .

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Welcoming newScale to Cisco – Storefront to the Cloud

As a follow-up to this discussion about Cloud Management, at EMC World 2011, I had the chance to do this quick video with Jeff Winter to discuss:

  • An introduction to newScale
  • Where newScale fits into a Cloud Computing environment
  • Why Enterprise and Service Provider customers choose newScale
  • newScale’s alignment with Cisco’s Cloud vision
  • Open integration with leading Cloud Computing tools and platforms

As you can see, newScale is a great platform to build your Cloud storefront and extend your Journey to Cloud.

To learn more about Cisco’s Cloud Solutions, please visit the Cloud homepage

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UNS Spotlight on Dynamic Workload Scaling with ACE and OTV

May 23, 2011 at 5:00 am PST

In an earlier Unified Network Services (UNS) blog update, we highlighted application performance monitoring with NAM and the important role it played in optimizing WAN acceleration deployments with WAAS. Today we are going to focus on another aspect of application performance and quality of service that we call Dynamic Workload Scaling (DWS) or Cloud Bursting. The basic scenario is that one of our mission critical data center applications experiences intermittent (and potentially unexpected) peak loads that can overwhelm the server resources that are typically required for the quality of service (QoS) that we require. An example might be an online flower store that gets two orders of magnitude more traffic in the weeks of Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day than the other 50 weeks of the year (although, in this case the expanded capacity is largely predictable).

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