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Data Center at the Cisco Partner Summit 2012 –Be Real or Virtual but Be There!

At Cisco Data Center, we recognize that our community of partners is a critical sales success factor. – So the annual event Partner Summit, this year in San Diego California  April 16-19 is a big deal!

In fact, the physical event in San Diego is already sold out, demonstrating clearly the dynamism of the Cisco partner community, which is more and more attracted to the Cisco Business proposition, the solutions and now the services opportunities.

But to make sure that every partner can benefit from this opportunity , the summit will come this year to you live via Virtual Partner Summit (VPS). All you have to do is register. Here is my list of the must watch data center sessions –

General Session with Keith Goodwin, John Chambers, Edison Peres

General Session with Edison Peres and Padmasree Warrior

Data Center & Virtualization Go-To-Market: The Unified Data Center Practice, Programs Evolution & Partner Incentives

Cisco Virtualization Experience Infrastructure : Game-Changing Vision, Unprecedented Opportunity

BYOD and Beyond : It’s Not About the Device, it’s About Delivering the Next-Generation Workspace

Winning with Cloud: GTM updates on  Strategy, Solutions and Partner Programs

Having said that, there are a lot of other sessions, that you probably will find of a great interest! All the news and program announcements, the business and technology sessions, but also chat with executives are a click away . It can’t  really be easier. If you want to know more about the Virtual Partner Summit, including the prize that you can win by registering, watch this video and check these  blogs   Virtual Tour of Cisco’s Virtual Partner Summit 2012 and Know before you go : Cisco Partner Summit 2012

If you are already registered to attend physically the summit in San Diego , here are some interesting facts

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API Compatibility: From cruising at self-service speed to “we gotta have a meeting”

Today’s announcement that Citrix is dropping support for OpenStack has reverberated through the clouderati sphere like a new Justin Bieber song through my niece’s third grade class. Super important but will not matter much when the next idol arrives.

In any case, a lot of smart people have written about it. I’ll leave them to explain the whole thing.

Cloud Avenue has a good in-depth coverage post. And so does James Staten of Forrester. Randy Bias also weighs in as well.  I’m sure I’m missing other worthy commentators.

But the post that most caught my attention came from Thorsten at Rightscale‘s.  We both share something in common: we both build products that connect to cloud API’s. Including vendor who have API’s that claim to be compatible EC2. This experience, I think provides a useful point of view when thinking about API compatibility. Not to mention it creates a jaundiced view of the human soul.

Thorsten writes.

I’ve said it many times and I’ll repeat it again: it’s the semantics of the resources in the cloud that matter, not the syntax of the API. This means that “API compatibility” has to reach very, very deep to be meaningful. Let me give you a couple of examples around EC2.

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The Rise of Cisco UCS and the Cisco Services Data Center Transformation Experience

March 2009 was an exciting time for both for Cisco and for me personally.  Cisco launched the revolutionary Unified Computing System, with many observers across the industry doubting if we’d stay the course (and if we’re honest, some truly misplaced derision – I wonder who is on Planet Zircon now!).  And I joined the Cisco Data Center Services team from the Cisco R&D organization!  So with the recent third generation launch of Cisco UCS, described very well by my colleague Todd Brannon, I thought it would be a good time to reflect on our data center services portfolio around that time, and where we are now.  My previous blogs chronicle part of this journey, however I have to say, the direct comparison I draw here I personally think shows that we have indeed brought a new transformational experience to the data center for our customers. And I’d like to give you my personal recollections on how and what I found out about Cisco’s approach to shaking the incumbents’ lack of innovation in the blade server market.

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“You’re going to need a bigger room” NC UCS User Group

The NC UCS User Group is a hit! The Users have spoken and with the help of some great speakers, we have successfully completed 2 NC User Group meetings for this quarter. We had very good turnout in both Greensboro and RTP.

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Big Data: Coming Soon to Your Doctor’s Examining Room – Part 2

William Moore is Executive Vice President and CTO for CareCore National, LLC. CareCore’s private cloud is based on the Cisco Unified Data Center.

This is part 2 of Bill Moore’s blog focused on Big Data in the healthcare industry. Read part 1 and related blog, “It’s a Boy!”

In part 1 of my blog I proposed that the cloud is succeeding in enabling new healthcare models where the original electronic medical records (EMRs) vision stalled. The reason is that the cloud has the scale to manage and analyze very large data sets—so-called big data.

Big data and the new analysis tools it demands are changing the game for healthcare. They reveal insights about outcomes across very large reservoirs of patient information that previously weren’t possible to analyze, at least not in real time.

The vision is giving your doctors an evidence-based clinical tool that factors in your entire history, collected from multiple independent sources. These might include lab results, previous physician input, hospital data, and retrospective claims history. Placing this kind of tool in a physician’s hands at the moment of need is game-changing.

Evidence-Based Clinical Tools in the Cloud

That’s what we do at CareCore. The foundation of our service is evidence-based medicine sourced from panels of leading physicians in their fields. We’ve added workflows to support the physician in collecting patient information that big-data analysis has shown to influence outcomes.

Consider a physician is treating a cardiac patient. Not long ago, the physician had to rely solely his or her own historical training and knowledge, and whatever research a busy practice allowed. Today, that same physician can access real-time data on thousands of similar cardiologists treating tens of thousands of similar patients, and can review various appropriate courses of treatment in the context of efficacy for other patients like the one sitting in the exam room right now.

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