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Using Human and Technology Networks to Tackle Homelessness

July 17, 2012 at 10:44 am PST

This post was written by Molly Tschang, customer solutions director, advisory services, reflecting the teamwork started by 20+ members of Cisco’s New York City public sector team

Ten to fifteen percent of America’s homeless population is chronically homeless. Yet they utilize more than 50 percent of public resources available to help the homeless.  Housing people permanently reconnects them to society and amounts to annual savings of US$30,000 to US$40,000 per family in New York City, money that could potentially support other city services.

Community Solutions is a leading social enterprise, assessing the roots of homelessness and addressing them with long-term solutions. Partnering with Community Solutions, Cisco’s New York City public sector team is tapping a broad range of Cisco’s assets--human and technology--to help end homelessness. At the same time, they are achieving the business aim of better understanding their customers’ mission and having greater, more meaningful impact as a business partner.

Networks tackle homelessness

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Diversity Makes Our World Bigger and Our Business Better

July 16, 2012 at 9:44 am PST

In my work for Cisco, I speak to people from all over the world. Some of them speak languages I’ve never heard of. Others celebrate holidays I’ve read about in books but not experienced. They live a world away, but they make my world bigger just by telling me a little bit about their lives.

This is just a small part of what it means to work in an inclusive and diverse environment like the one at Cisco.

Using Cisco TelePresence

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Military Veterans Need Support from U.S. Companies

July 4, 2012 at 10:17 am PST

This post was written by Michael Veysey, director of Veterans Programs at Cisco

Since September 11, 2001, men and women in the U.S. armed forces have fought in our nation’s longest wars. This all-volunteer force has endured sacrifices that most of us will never know or experience—all to protect our peace and freedom. So, hiring a qualified veteran into our ranks is our chance to say “thank you“ to our nation’s heroes.

Hiring veterans is not only a good thing to do, it also makes good business sense. Their knowledge, training, and experience, often under extreme conditions, demonstrate that they can thrive in a competitive and dynamic business environment.

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Cisco Networking Academy: A Model for Both Workforce Training and K-12 Education

June 26, 2012 at 2:38 pm PST

No matter where you are in the world, you need networking skills to be competitive in today’s economy. In many countries, a lack of people with information and communications technology (ICT) skills is the biggest impediment to global competitiveness.

In the current issue of the Brunswick Review, Cisco Vice President of Corporate Affairs Amy Christen discusses how Cisco Networking Academy is helping to bridge this ICT skills gap by training 1 million people in 165 countries each year to build, maintain, and secure computer networks. Some of the facts Amy shares in her interview may surprise you.

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High-Speed Network Helps Residents of World’s Largest Refugee Camp

June 20, 2012 at 1:59 pm PST

In eastern Kenya, on a harsh landscape of sand, wind, sun, and little else, 500,000 people who have fled famine, drought, and military conflict in Somalia over the last 20 years struggle to survive in the world’s largest refugee camp.

Last summer, the worst famine in 60 years forced more than 1000 people each day to seek refuge in Dadaab, a camp originally designed to accommodate only 90,000. The residents of Dadaab face chronic overcrowding, disease, hunger, and seasonal floods. An estimated 10,000 refugees are “third-generation”-- they were born in Dadaab to parents who were also born there.

This sounds like a world in which technology is a luxury, not a need. But the nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) working in Dadaab are stretched to their limits trying to provide food, housing, sanitation, and medical relief. They need technology, and Internet connectivity in particular, to coordinate their response efforts and provide lifesaving goods and services to the men, women, and children who need them.

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