Cisco Blogs


Cisco Blog > Collaboration

Enabling Collaboration with Cisco Interactive Services

Cisco has often touted our vision of delivering any video to any device, any where. Today, we are continuing that vision by extending enhanced collaboration capabilities to any digital sign or video endpoint. Cisco is introducing new products as part of Cisco Interactive Services, to transform any digital sign into a highly interactive display by delivering targeted, customized rich media content such as video, collaboration applications and Web pages and Web applications.

With these new innovations, you can now walk up to a touchscreen digital sign, browse through a variety of content to find the information you need that is most relevant to you, and access a remote expert to talk live if you have questions or need additional help. Today’s announcement is part of a larger evolution in the digital signage market, as digital signs move from just static displays to more dynamic video endpoints that become a medium for two-way communication. Customers across the world, in verticals such as retail and transportation, are now able to leverage these capabilities to create a more personal experience for their users and provide easy access to more information.

Interested in learning more? Head on over to our Video blog to see a video by the Director of Marketing for Cisco’s Enterprise Video Solutions, Erica Schroeder, and find out more details about today’s announcement and new digital signage customers.

Read More »

Tags: , , ,

Evolving Beyond the PC

For at least the past two decades, knowledge workers have been firmly rooted in the PC era. Within enterprises of all sizes, that meant that the predominant operating system on the desktop – and often in the data center — was Windows.

We had unprecedented productivity gains during this time, no doubt, but I would now firmly assert that as Ray Ozzie suggested — and Steve Jobs was more than happy to reinforce — that we are transitioning to an era where PCs play a secondary role, if at all – this is the Post PC era. 

I believe we will now have more access to more information on more devices from more applications than ever before.

It’s not as if PCs are going away, so what do we mean by the “Post-PC Era”? PCs have their place. They’re still useful business tools. But it’s clear: We are rapidly evolving from a predominantly client-server world to one in which the Windows PC is just another device in a broad list of options.

We now have many choices in devices – even the option to perform the same tasks on different devices depending on our preferences at different times. Everything is anchored by persistent services that enable device portability and mobility

Once upon a time, I dreaded having to replace my mobile phone or PC. The transition invariably brought with it lost data, lost time, lost sanity… But I can now upgrade from one device to another fairly quickly without breaking much of a sweat. And I really need that ability if I want to keep up with the latest advances in technology.

Why is that? Because it’s cloud-enabled!

Although they’ve performed well for over two decades, traditional business tools and infrastructure based around the desktop PC and office-productivity software no longer exclusively fit the modern knowledge worker nor the global distributed form of 21st century work.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Authenticity Creates Trust; Trust Accelerates Collaboration

Collaboration is indeed the business opportunity of the decade, promising to energize your organization while making more effective use of your precious assets.  My Cisco colleague Carl Wiese and I wrote a book called The Collaboration Imperative: Executive Strategies for Unlocking Your Organization’s True Potential to help organizations “operationalize” collaboration and capture these gains. Our goal wasn’t to write a “theory” book, but rather one that drills down into specific actions, with concrete examples of how to put collaboration to work in the real world.

As Carl noted in a previous post, effective collaboration is a function of aligning culture, process and technology.  But how do you do that?   Here is a one example from the book: Collaborative teams work best when they’re made up of people who communicate openly.

Collaboration technologies, especially video, make it easy to reach people across an organization and around the world.  Anyone who has traded their economy-class airline seat in favor of a Telepresence meeting knows the powerful benefits of collapsing space and time with an engaging video meeting.  However, as we cross departmental, cultural and time-zone boundaries, collaboration puts our personal communication skills to the test.

As we increasingly interact virtually, we work more and more with people we don’t know or have a long history with; they may actually work in a different company and teams may come and go in rapid succession.  Establishing rapport –- quickly –- is one of the most important aspects of successful collaboration, and it starts with communicating authentically.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

What Does the New Collaboration Experience Mean to You?

For me, collaboration in business is about people working together across functions and disciplines from the C-Level suite all the way down to the mail room. It’s about the experience. When people get intellectually and emotionally involved with others through collaboration, it’s that set of experiences, thoughts, and feelings that bond them together in a common cause.

More businesses are recognizing that critical relationships with both their internal constituents and external stakeholders—employees, partners, investors, media, and customers—are about the collection of experiences and touch points those audience members and key collaborators have with their organization. So, if collaborative relationships are a continuum of experiences, then it follows that businesses should optimize those experiences for maximum impact. To learn more about how the customer care industry evolved to focus on “the complete experience,” click here.

Read More »

Tags: ,

The Olympics as a B2B Marketing Proposition

The essence of sponsorship is the right of association, as enshrined in the International Chamber of Commerce’s definition:

‘Any communication by which a sponsor, for the mutual benefit of sponsor and sponsored party, contractually provides financing or other support in order to establish a positive association between the sponsor’s image, brands, products or services and a sponsored event, activity, organization or individual.’

The difference between the Olympic and Paralympic Games and other major sporting events is that they are the only property that offers sponsors virtually nothing but the right of association.  Unlike other platforms, which will build in assets and benefits to their sponsorship package like perimeter board branding or event tickets, the only direct benefit you get from investing in a Games sponsorship is the right to use certain logos and marks.  Even then, these must be approved on a case by case basis. Everything else, including hospitality tickets, comes at an incremental price.

So Games sponsors cannot rely on a nice big advertising value equivalent from broadcast brand visibility to justify the fee internally.  They are forced to be much more disciplined in their assessment of how a Games sponsorship will create an acceptable return on investment. These sponsors must focus on who their target audience/s are, why partnering with the Games is relevant to them, how they are going to communicate those messages effectively and what is the desired behavioural outcome.

Read More »

Tags: , , ,