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Capacity Planning Challenges at Cisco

 Capacity planning is facing some significant problems with two new services in the future:  high definition desktop/laptop video, and home Telepresence.  Video has a significant impact on bandwidth use, and these two services threaten to place new demands on the network.

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Service Capacity Planning at Cisco

Capacity planning is getting far more complicated as network services get more complex, and it requires understanding each service as a whole, cutting across several traditional IT services like network and data center capacity planning.  Here’s how Cisco IT is starting to address these new service-based capacity issues, mainly focusing on Network and Voice Capacity Management

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Service Capacity Planning at Cisco

Capacity planning is getting far more complicated as network services get more complex, and it requires understanding each service as a whole, cutting across several traditional IT services like network and data center capacity planning.  Here’s how Cisco IT is starting to address these new service-based capacity issues, mainly focusing on Network and Voice Capacity Management

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Capacity Planning at Cisco

 Capacity planning depends on accurate measurement; but what you do with the measurements depends on the service, the region, and where your business is going.  Here’s how we do it, and what we expect to be facing in the future.

 Measuring WAN circuit capacity depends on the circuit design at each branch office.   Standard Cisco architecture for any WAN connection is a primary and a secondary WAN circuit.  For most sites, where available and cost effective, the two circuits are the same size and we load balance across the two.  Sometimes however, to reduce costs we provide a smaller backup circuit, and assume that some of the traffic will not be served during the short time of a primary WAN link outage (video conferencing may stop, voice may go out the voice gateway, etc.).  Capacity planning gets done on the primary circuit.

 There are not many tools available for doing capacity planning, and not much automation that has grown up around that process.   Mostly, we use 3 different homegrown reports for this.  The first of these reports remain the same from our earlier capacity-planning days; the second helps us deal with transient peak traffic; and the third helps us look at service levels.

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Unified Communications Server Architecture: Location Matters

Cisco has consolidated our unified communications server architecture twice since we first transitioned from PBX systems. Initially, we deployed Cisco Unified Communications Managers in all 256 global Cisco offices.

The first big shift came when we moved to a centralized Unified Communications architecture, deploying 15 Cisco Unified Communications Manager clusters worldwide, which support more than 130,000 hardware phones and 70,000 software phones. The centralized clusters deliver voice services to other Cisco offices over the Cisco global WAN.

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