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My Internet of Everything Holiday Wish List

‘Tis the season to shop and to make resolutions  for the coming year. I’m doing a fair bit of both, inspired by the many Internet of Everything (IoE) products that are popping up everywhere. And while it’s the season of giving, I’m also finding plenty of things I wouldn’t mind getting myself. According to the National Retail Federation, I’m not alone. “Self gifting” makes up almost a third of all holiday shopping.

IoE is about things connecting to the Internet, millions of things. It’s about turning the data they collect into information we can act on or respond to. Cisco defines IoE as bringing together people, process, data, and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable than ever before. Read More »

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IoT: Moving from Connecting Devices to Capturing Insights

There’s a lot at stake—$19 trillion in fact—as companies transform into digital businesses to capture value from the Internet of Everything (IoE). More than 42 percent of this value, or $8 trillion, will come from one of IoE’s chief enablers, the Internet of Things (IoT). While IoE is the networked connection of people, process, data, and things, IoT is the intelligent connectivity of physical devices that is driving massive gains in efficiency, business growth, and quality of life. So why worry about IoT when we have IoE? Simple, IoT often represents the quickest path to IoE and the $19 trillion that’s there for the taking.

Cisco Consulting Services recently conducted a blind global survey to Read More »

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Future Innovators and Entrepreneurs: The IoTWF Young Women’s Innovation Grand Challenge is Open

GirlsForIoTInnovation sqIn October at the Internet of Things World Forum we announced the Young Women’s Innovation Grand Challenge.  This challenge was announced to help bring more women into the sciences as we connect more of the unconnected with the Internet of Things. I’m pleased to announce that the IoT World Forum Young Women’s Innovation Grand Challenge is now open for submissions!

This challenge came about as a way to help address one of the biggest challenges to the Internet of Things – the dearth of technologically trained workers.  Over the next few years, technology jobs –those requiring a degree in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM), are expected to grow twice as fast as non-STEM jobs.  While the demand for this workforce is growing, women are a significantly under-utilized resource.  In the United States, a little over 18% of computer science and engineering degrees are awarded to women – while in general more women are getting bachelor’s degrees, the number of women in STEM has declined over the last 20 years from highs of 20.9% for engineering in 2002 and 29% for computer science in 1991. Read More »

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Children’s National Health System Improves Medical Services With the Internet of Everything

Most parents share a common fear – that something might happen to their child, and they won’t be able to help or make them better. No parent wants to jump in the car with a sick child for a trip to the emergency room. But if that fever just won’t break or the cough is only getting worse, most parents know the hospital is often the best bet. But what happens if the local hospital isn’t local at all, and is instead hours away? Or, if the one specialist in the area isn’t due to visit until next week? For remote areas both in the U.S. and globally, this can be an everyday reality.

Thanks to technology advancements in the past few decades – of which the Internet of Everything has powered most – distance doesn’t have to play a factor anymore. Doctors and hospitals can be on call for all parents whenever needed, not just for parents in the local neighborhood. Read More »

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IoE Takes the Shirt Off Your Back, and Makes It Smarter and Healthier

Connecting Dark Assets: An ongoing series on how the Internet of Everything is transforming the ways in which we live, work, play, and learn.

It may be true that the clothes make the person, as Shakespeare wrote in Hamlet. But even he never imagined how the Internet of Everything (IoE) would be changing the nature of the clothes we wear. IoE is the ongoing explosion in networked connections among people, process, data, and things. And when IoE is applied to wearable technology, it places the “people” element at the center, connecting users with information they can use to live healthier lives.

The new workout shirt Ralph Lauren introduced in August at the U.S. Open tennis tournament is a great example. With sensors knitted into the fabric, the “Polo Tech” t-shirt records heart rate, breathing rate, breathing depth, steps walked, calories burned, and heart-rate variation. A small clip-on “black box” sends this wealth of physiological information to a smartphone app, which displays the length and intensity of your workout in an attractive graphical format, and keeps track of progress over time. When you’re done with your workout, you can just unclip the black box and toss the shirt into the washer.

The Polo Tech shirt was created in partnership with Canadian company OMSignal, which is developing an array of connected clothing designed for fitness and everyday life. One shirt monitors stress levels and can lead you through a series of relaxation techniques when your stress gets too high. It can also nudge you to get up and move around if you’ve been inactive for a while. The company even envisions a maternity tank top in the future that monitors both the mother’s and baby’s vital signs.

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