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Connected Contact Centers in the Era of the Internet of Everything

November 18, 2014 at 1:38 pm PST

The contact center came into being nearly 25 years ago and is now the de facto communication channel for organizations to connect with their customers. A lot has changed since then. And there’s much more change to come with mobility, big data, collaboration, and the Internet of Everything making their collective mark on the user experience.

Recently Paul Stockford, founder and chief analyst of Saddletree Research, and I discussed the evolution of the contact center and our predictions for what’s next. You can listen to the Future of IT podcast episode via iTunes.

Our top predictions: Read More »

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Industry First: h.264 Video endpoint calls Firefox via Webrtc-enabled Project Squared

Yesterday on stage at Cisco Collaboration Summit, I demonstrated an industry first – the first non-transcoded video call between a webRTC application and an existing video endpoint.

Why is this significant? WebRTC is an exciting new technology, enabling real-time voice and video calling natively in the browser. Up until now WebRTC-enabled applications have not been able to connect to existing video collaboration gear that companies may own, from room systems to desktop video endpoints.

Today, Cisco has broken the barriers that previously prevented browser-based collaboration from connecting with existing video hardware. Companies that have invested in video collaboration can now extend that collaboration to the browser, enabling their users to collaborate from anywhere, at any time.

Yesterday, Andreas Gal, the CTO of Mozilla, joined me on stage. He called a simple SIP URI on a Cisco video endpoint, which instantly rang my Project Squared client running in Firefox. By leveraging WebRTC and Cisco’s OpenH264 binary module integrated into Firefox, we had a great voice and video call, without  plugins, complex and cumbersome browser downloads, or expensive transcoding gear in the cloud. Check out a demo of what we did onstage here:

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Have questions about Hybrid WANs? Quiz the Cisco Geeks!

These are just a few of the many questions that were asked on the webinar ‘How to Deliver Uncompromising Branch Application Performance‘:

  • Would DMVPN also allow me to easily integrate networks using multiple MPLS providers?
  • Is there a specific router model, IOS required for a PfRv3 branch controller and master controller?
  • Can you explain how the direct spoke-to-spoke routing is accomplished when using DMVPN?
  • Is using BGP with DMVPN scalable? Wouldn’t we have to define each neighbor?

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Innovation for Every Type of Customer Expands Partner Opportunities

November 18, 2014 at 9:30 am PST

One year ago at Cisco Collaboration Summit 2013, we set out on a mission to bring amazing collaboration experiences to every room, every desktop, and every pocket. We’ve had an incredible year delivering simple and affordable collaboration technologies leading up to Collaboration Summit 2014 this week in Los Angeles. In addition to yesterday’s news, today, the innovation continues as we announce two new Business Edition collaboration solutions for businesses of every size. Designed for partners to take to market, these packaged collaboration solutions make it easier for you to sell, deploy, and manage.

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Packaged Collaboration for Every Size Business

The new Cisco Business Edition 6000S is designed for smaller deployments – up to 150 users -- while meeting all your customers’ essential collaboration needs. It’s preconfigured with five unified communications applications and built on a cutting edge router, yet can seamlessly migrate to full-scale collaboration platforms. No other vendor offers an integrated router, server and gateway for this market segment, which provides an enormous competitive edge for you. Read More »

Reversing Multilayer .NET Malware

This post was authored by Dave McDaniel with contributions from Jaeson Schultz

Recently, we came across a malware sample that has been traversing the Internet disguised as an image of a woman. The malware sample uses several layers of obfuscation to hide its payload, including the use of steganography. Steganography is the practice of concealing a message, image, or file within another message, image, or file. Steganography can be used in situations where encryption might bring unwanted attention. Encrypted traffic from an unusual source is going to draw unwanted attention. Steganography allows malicious payloads to hide in plain sight. It also allows the attacker to bypass security devices. In our sample malware, steganography is used to decrypt and execute a second dropper, which in turn installs a user-land rootkit to further hide its intentions. The rootkit adds another layer of obfuscation by installing a DarkComet backdoor, using RC4 encryption to encrypt its configuration settings and send data to its command and control server.

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