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Top Coders Win Cisco CMX Mobility Challenge

Over 30 registrants competed in an online global Cisco developer challenge to use the CMX Mobility Services API and CMX in a new app using a simulated environment for a meeting host to automatically launch a WebEx conference, based on the location of the conference room where the meeting is scheduled.  Guidance was provided in a previous blog post, which you too can use to develop innovative applications to create your own Connected Mobile Experience.

topcoder

Numerous impressive submissions demonstrated how straightforward it was to create a new mobile application using the CMX APIs and SDK.  The winning entries submitted code, a video demo, and a read me file, which together conveyed their work using real-time location updates to trigger a context-aware push notification.

First place entry from a brand new TopCoder member “gitsIndonesia” received a check for $1500. It included very clean Android Java code which was well-designed and easy to follow, while applying object-oriented practices. It provided a great example of how to build a new location app from the ground up using the CMX APIs with no changes required for the server simulator since the client (the app) was used for location polling. Read More »

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SCTE IP Challenge: Perspective From Last Year’s Winner, Kenneth Corbett

kenneth-corbettThis is a guest blog contributed by Kenneth Corbett, DOCSIS Engineer, Charter Communications.           

The Cisco IP Challenge in partnership with the SCTE is an exciting, tiring, and beneficial event for any engineer. The IP Challenge format is pretty simple. You have two online qualifier rounds where the top 9 scores receive an invite for a live competition at the SCTE Expo. There are three jeopardy styled heats at the live event. The three winners of those heats participate in a live configuration event to crown the overall champion.

I have participated in the IP challenge online qualifier for two years. Anyone who has ever done this knows the feeling of clearing the board then waiting for bonuses and tokens. It involves a 24/7 watching and waiting for things to pop up. Let’s just say you’re low on sleep by the end of each round. You have two qualifier events spread out over a month or so. You have to watch and try to score as highly as possible in each round to ensure a spot in the final nine participants. You pass the time chatting with your peers from all areas in the chat and share your experience. The first year I participated I was one of the final 9 but I was unable to attend due to logistics. Last year I was finally able to go to the live event.

The SCTE Expo is exciting for a number of reasons and that is one of the perks of participating in the live event for the Cisco IP Challenge is the free pass. You’re Read More »

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Moving Public Safety Forward: Invest in the Future, Not the Past.

Moving Public Safety Forward:  Invest in the Future, Not the Past.

Use Existing Radio System and Smartphones, with an Etherstack and Cisco Solution

If you’ve got an analog radio system, upgrading to P25 just got much easier and much less expensive.

Some agencies have received an end-of-life and end-of-support notice from their radio network manufacturer. If you’re in this position, there’s a better option for entering the FirstNet era than upgrading your entire radio infrastructure. The problem with jumping to another proprietary radio network is that it might lock you into another 20-year single-vendor solution.Communicate, Collaborate, Operate

Now there’s an effective and cost efficient way to modernize your existing network radio network infrastructure—whether or not it’s P25, and even if it’s reached end of life. Here are three steps.

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The #InternetOfEverything Machine and What it Means to the World

Typically art and technology make strange bedfellows. But the Internet of Everything Machine at Cisco Live San Francisco in June was undeniably one of the coolest interactive installations I’ve seen at a conference. The exhibit simulated an attendee’s journey through a city connected by real-time data, so each visitor got a unique and personalized digital city experience. More importantly, it demonstrated how the Internet of Everything will help a city run more efficiently and the positive impact that can have on citizens.

From streetlights that turn themselves off to save energy and recycling bins that communicate when they’re full, to self-adjusting traffic lights that prevent traffic jams and smart luggage that tracks itself – the possibilities are endless.

The Internet of Everything Machine was a temporary exhibit at Cisco Live, but the Internet of Everything is becoming our reality. While it is certain to shape our future, it’s also in action today. The Internet of Everything (IoE) is not a tangible item. Rather, it is the connections between people, process, data and things that create more valuable and relevant experiences than any of us could have ever imagined before.

Ioe Machine Erica Schroeder 8.7.14

Many elements that make up the Internet of Everything are not new and each can function independently. But, the true power of the Internet of Everything lies in all of them working together to create richer experiences and economic opportunities for everyone – businesses, individuals and even countries.

For example, a recent economic analysis estimates the Internet of Everything represents a $19 trillion opportunity for public and private sector organizations over the next decade. This occurs from cost savings, productivity gains, new revenue and improved citizen, worker and consumer experiences.

The Internet of Everything makes our everyday lives more convenient. Our ability to make payments from our smart devices, a store associate using a hand-held device to expedite checkouts and even one day riding in a self-driving car are all innovations made possible by the Internet of Everything.

The Internet of Everything Machine gave Cisco Live attendees a glimpse into a concept city that could run seamlessly with the Internet of Everything. And all over the world, corporations, municipal agencies and individuals have used it to improve their operations and even their health:

  • In Dubai, one of the world’s fastest-growing and cosmopolitan cities, cranes that swing too close to one another are halted by an Internet-connected system, safeguarding a network of 37 cranes and 5,000 workers near the world’s tallest buildings.
  • Though many of its operations take place deep inside mountains, Dundee Precious Metals utilizes WiFi-enabled vehicles, haulers and crushers and above-ground command centers to capture real-time data, resulting in a cost-savings of $2.5 million and production increase of 400%.
  • Wearables have made great strides in improving healthcare and have the potential to save lives when seconds count. Already, 21% of Americans use wearable devices to help track health data. What’s even more exciting for the medical field and patient care is that wearables can be outfitted with technology that allows them to communicate with doctors and other healthcare professionals directly. A Band-Aid that indicates if a wound is healed, skin patch wireless blood glucose monitors and systems that sound an alert when it’s time to refill a prescription are all possible through the Internet of Everything.
  • New York, a burgeoning “Smart City” has partnered with City 24x7 to make public communications available to anyone, anytime, anywhere with their Smart Screens. These screens are interactive and highly-visible in area train stations, malls and sport facilities and transmit offers, services and area information in real-time. And, they can be accessed via smartphones, tablets and laptops!

Through these few examples it’s easy to see that the Internet of Everything’s societal and enterprise advances are making a real impact. The Internet of Everything is changing everything about the way we live and the ways we can live. There will be challenges, but as John Chambers noted, overcoming them will take precedence, because the benefits are far too great to ignore.

Dream big – what are some of the innovations you’d like to see the Internet of Everything make possible? What does your City of Tomorrow look like? We want to know what examples of the Internet of Everything you see in your own City of Tomorrow – your neighborhood! Join the conversation online by tagging your photo and video examples with #InternetOfEverything and #CityOfTomorrow.

Be sure to follow @CiscoIoE on Twitter and join the conversation, #InternetOfEverything and #CityOfTomorrow.

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Building Professional Skills for the Internet of Things

August 7, 2014 at 7:30 am PST

In my conversations with our customers and partners, one of most frequent topics is the need of aligning the skills of the Operational Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT) professionals to the new capabilities offered by Internet of Things (IoT) related technologies and solutions, and the changing conditions and demands of the business.

There is plenty of training in the market about configuring and maintaining all the new smart objects that are coming to the market. But the specific nature of these devices radically changes the way the essential infrastructure that is needed to interconnect them should be planned, designed, deployed and maintained. These are not traditional networks.

The IoT network infrastructure for all these new “things” has to deal with several new challenges. For one, IoT devices are not traditional computing devices. There are literally hundreds of different protocols used by these devices.  They may have very specific needs in terms of speed and frequency of connectivity.  Many of them are super susceptible to changes in delay and latency, some of them connect intermittently, while some others just come in range from time to time.  Many operate 24x7 under the harshest conditions, and a lot of them where designed to operate in hierarchical and closed loop networks.

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