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Cisco UCS Delivers Best Two-Socket Server SAP SD Benchmark Result with Microsoft Windows

Cisco Unified Computing System™  is unique among vendors with its comprehensive set of solutions for SAP and SAP HANA workloads—solutions that include servers with two to eight processors. Cisco Cisco UCS® C220 M4 Rack Server delivered 16,025 users and a SAPS score of 87,680: the best two-processor, two-tier result running Microsoft Windows 2012 Datacenter Edition.

Some of the key highlights of this result are:

  • Best Two-Socket Server SAP SD Benchmark Result: The Cisco UCS C240 M4 running Microsoft Windows Server 2012 delivered the best two-tier SAP SD Benchmark result with SAP Enhancement Package 5 for SAP ERP 6.0 and Microsoft SQL Server 2012. The solution supported 16,025 SAP SD Benchmark users while maintaining a consistent application response time of less than one second
  • Scale to meet demand: Cisco UCS C240 M4 Rack Server configured with the Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 v3 family can support up to 16,025 concurrent SAP SD Benchmark users in a Microsoft Windows Server 2012 and Microsoft SQL Server 2012 environment.
  • Optimize application throughput: High-performance rack servers, blade servers, and network fabrics enable Cisco UCS to handle many SAP application tasks, with results showing that the system can process 1,753,670 order line items per hour or 5,261,000 dialog steps per hour.
  • Cisco Consistently Improves Two-Processor, Two- Tier SAP SD Benchmark Performance: As illustrated in the graph below, these results show almost a 60 percent improvement over performance delivered by the last generation of Intel Xeon processor E5 product family CPUs.

 

SAP SD Comparison
The SAP SD Benchmark is designed to stress the computing infrastructure and determine whether a consistent response can be delivered as more users consume system resources. Cisco tested a Cisco UCS C240 M4 server equipped with two 2.30-GHz, 18-core Intel Xeon processor E5-2699 v3 CPUs, 256 GB of main memory, and a Cisco UCS Virtual Interface Card (VIC) 1225. The server ran both the SAP software and the 64-bit Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Enterprise Edition in a bare-metal configuration. Check out the Performance Brief and the detailed official benchmark disclosure report for additional information on the benchmark configuration.

Let’s see, what does this latest result mean for our customers?

  • This result proves that Cisco UCS servers make an excellent foundation for any standards-based infrastructure solution.
  • Cisco UCS dramatically reduces the number of physical components needed to support demanding SAP landscape applications, enabling IT departments to make effective use of limited space, power, and cooling resources.
  • By deploying SAP on Cisco UCS, IT departments can support more users and accelerate response times. Many users can be supported—up to 16,025 in the benchmark configuration—with little hardware
  • IT departments can choose from a broad range of Cisco UCS blade and rack server models to scale deployments further by using larger servers or by adding servers to create scale-out deployments with small footprints.

It is interesting to note that although all vendors have access to same Intel processors, only Cisco UCS unleashes their power to deliver high performance to applications through the power of unification. The unique, fabric-centric architecture of Cisco UCS integrates the Intel Xeon processors into a system with a better balance of resources that brings processor power to life. For additional information on Cisco UCS and Cisco UCS Integrated Infrastructure solutions please visit Cisco Unified Computing & Servers web page.

Disclosure

The statement of comparison is based on highest-performing system using two Intel Xeon processors and running SAP Enhancement Package 5 for SAP ERP 6.0 on Microsoft Windows Server 2012 Datacenter Edition in a two-tier configuration. Results referenced are available from the SAP website at: http://global.sap.com/solutions/benchmark/sd2tier.epx and are current as of December 1, 2014.

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Complexity AND Control in the Cloud

Guest post from Dan Swart

Dan Swart is a Senior Manager in Cisco Technical Services Product Management, leading the team responsible for Enterprise and Data Center Solution Support services. Along with that, Dan has been heavily involved in Data Center Alliance programs and Converged Infrastructures. Dan has Batchelor of Science Degrees in Zoology and Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University.

Dan Swart is a Senior Manager in Cisco Technical Services Product Management, leading the team responsible for Enterprise and Data Center Solution Support services. Along with that, Dan has been heavily involved in Data Center Alliance programs and Converged Infrastructures. Dan has Bachelor of Science Degrees in Zoology and Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University.

We want what we want when we want it. Never truer than today when we’ve got a global marketplace of technology vendors vying to deliver on now practically required solutions like enterprise cloud.

While it’s really impossible today to deploy an enterprise cloud using products created by a single vendor, would we want it any other way?  Yes, there are major component manufacturers that can sell most of the products needed to build an enterprise cloud, but the restrictions inherent in those offers, and the need for margin stacking to single source all needed hardware and software from a component manufacturer may limit the attractiveness of those options.

Most of the customers we work with want to build their enterprise cloud using products that are “best for my needs” rather than products that are what a single manufacturer offers.  Along with that, enterprise license agreements, volume purchase agreements and other factors make it difficult to purchase a cloud infrastructure from a single source.   For those reasons and others, most enterprise cloud deployments are inherently multivendor.

So great, you get exactly what you want and need. What could go wrong? Famous last words. Read More »

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IoT: Moving from Connecting Devices to Capturing Insights

There’s a lot at stake—$19 trillion in fact—as companies transform into digital businesses to capture value from the Internet of Everything (IoE). More than 42 percent of this value, or $8 trillion, will come from one of IoE’s chief enablers, the Internet of Things (IoT). While IoE is the networked connection of people, process, data, and things, IoT is the intelligent connectivity of physical devices that is driving massive gains in efficiency, business growth, and quality of life. So why worry about IoT when we have IoE? Simple, IoT often represents the quickest path to IoE and the $19 trillion that’s there for the taking.

Cisco Consulting Services recently conducted a blind global survey to Read More »

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Under the Hood: Cisco Collaboration Cloud

It’s been two weeks since the launch of Project Squared and the Cisco Collaboration Cloud. We’ve received fantastic feedback and great uptake. And we’re really happy that so many people are using Project Squared – and liking the experience.

I’d like to take you on a little behind-the-scenes tour and shed some light on the Cisco Collaboration Cloud and how it works. Here is a 10,000 foot view of the architecture:

Jdrosen blog image 12_15_14

The core architecture is built on OpenStack. We use it for compute, networking, and storage services. OpenStack supports both the functional components of the architecture as well as the operational services, such as: logging, metrics, events, health and even VPN services (for inter-DC messaging and replication). Read More »

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Ancient Mac Site Harbors Botnet that Exploits IE Vulnerability

This post was authored by Alex Chiu and Shaun Hurley.

Last month, Microsoft released a security bulletin to patch CVE-2014-6332, a vulnerability within Windows Object Linking and Embedding (OLE) that could result in remote code execution if a user views a maliciously crafted web page with Microsoft Internet Explorer. Since then, there have been several documented examples of attackers leveraging this vulnerability and attempting to compromise users. On November 26th, Talos began observing and blocking an attack disguised as a hidden iframe on a compromised domain to leverage this vulnerability and compromise Internet Explorer users.

Read More »

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