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Have you registered for #CiscoEduForum 2013?

Now is the time to seize these opportunities. To expand education beyond classroom walls.  To help teachers and learners collaborate more effectively. To create new teaching experiences that engage learners and improve outcomes. So tomorrow’s students will be prepared to take on the challenges of a rapidly changing world.

But first, schools of all levels must prepare by arming themselves with a solid network, strong policies, and seamless management.

Cisco’s Virtual Forum for Education can link you with educators and innovation leaders from around the world to talk about best practices and practical strategies to overcome the challenges of mobility and technology in the classroom. You will have the opportunity to interact live with education thought leaders and Cisco experts on trends and technologies that are shaping the future of education.

The virtual event is March 19th, 2013 in the Americas & Europe and March 20th for Asia Pacific.

Register before it’s too late!

Read more on the education blog

For more on Cisco Education solutions, visit Cisco K-12 Education BYOD Solutions.

Answering the Two Most-Asked Questions About the Internet of Everything #IoE

Since Cisco began discussing the Internet of Everything (IoE) last year, two questions have arisen consistently:

1) What is the difference between IoE and the Internet of Things (IoT)?
According to Cisco, IoE brings together people (humans), process (manages the way people, data, and things work together), data (rich information), and things (inanimate objects and devices) to make networked connections more relevant and valuable than ever before—turning information into actions that create new capabilities, richer experiences, and unprecedented economic opportunity for businesses, individuals, and countries.

To better understand this definition, it is helpful to take a quick look at the evolution of the Internet. In the early 1990s, devices connected to the Internet were essentially “fixed.” For example, you went to your desk to use your PC, dumb terminal, or other device. At its peak, this first wave reached about 200 million devices by the late 1990s.

Around the year 2000, devices started to come with you. Remember lugging around your first “brick” mobile phone? As the number of both fixed and mobile devices (including machines) ballooned, the number of things connected to the Internet increased, reaching about 10 billion this year. This wave of Internet growth ushered in IoT, or as I sometimes call it, the “Age of the Device.”

IOE_IOT2

Cisco believes the third wave of Internet growth has already begun. As the things connected to the Internet are joined by people and more intelligent data (as Cisco’s definition describes), IoE could potentially connect 50 billion people, data, and things by 2020.

So, what is the difference between IoT and IoE? Read More »

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Tools of the Trade: cvrfparse

Prologue

In this article, you will be provided a thorough treatise on an in-house developed tool for parsing and validating CVRF documents aptly named “cvrfparse”. The article is split into two parts. The first part, intended for CVRF document producers and consumers, is a hands-on manual detailing how to use cvrfparse. The second part, intended for burgeoning Python programmers, explores some of the inner workings of the tool.

Introduction

The CVRF parser or “cvrfparse” is a Python-based command line tool that offers simple parsing and validation of CVRF documents. Using it, you can quickly query a CVRF document for any of its contents. For example, let’s say one of your vendors releases a bundle of security advisories encoded in CVRF. There are a dozen individual CVRF documents each with multiple vulnerabilities across hundreds of products. Using cvrfparse, you can quickly ascertain which documents contain vulnerable products you might have installed in your infrastructure. We’ll see how, shortly.

Read More »

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Justice Goes Digital in Collin County

March 18, 2013 at 5:26 am PST

Over the years, I’ve seen how telepresence technologies revolutionize the way organizations of all sizes do business, but one area where I’m really excited about the potential is within the court system.

Here in Collin County, north of Dallas, our local court system is pushing the envelope when it comes to video technology. In addition to conducting felony pleas via video, a centrally located video system in the courthouse connects attorneys with their clients without having to a make trip to the county jail. Not only does the county’s telepresence technology increase efficiency and cut transportation costs for both attorneys and detainees alike, but it also fosters collaboration and innovation within the justice system. The county’s presiding judge uses the technology to connect with lawyers and judges across the country to share best practices and innovative solutions.

Watch this video featuring the judge, IT directors and attorneys, to see how Collin County is benefiting from telepresence…beyond a reasonable doubt. Read More »

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No Free Lunch

This is the fourth in a series of blogs comparing and contrasting the Microsoft and Cisco approaches to providing enterprise collaboration in the post-PC world. The first blog discussed the differences between a purpose-built architecture and a desktop-centric approach that needs third party extensions to make a working enterprise-class system. The second blog discussed how the two companies are approaching the trend towards “Bring your own device” (BYOD) to work. The third  blog discussed how the two companies deliver voice and video. This fourth blog focuses on the true cost to deploy.

No Free Lunch

A little after lunch time today at Enterprise Connect, Nemertes Research will host a session to present its findings on a topic near and dear to Cisco’s heart: “Building the Business Case for UC”. Drawing on data supplied by hundreds of IT decision makers on Unified Communications products and technologies, attendees apparently will “leave the session with a clear picture of the elements of a successful UC business case”.

Having this session right after lunch seems appropriate, since the session could easily be named: There’s no Such Thing as a Free Lunch.

As you may know, just a few weeks ago Cisco’s Rowan Trollope started a conversation about what matters in collaboration. The topic is so important to Cisco that we launched a web page to communicate our view on the key considerations in evaluating an enterprise collaboration solution, with a special focus on the differences between Cisco and Microsoft. So it is exciting to see the industry hone in on one of these considerations: cost and licensing.

Cisco believes that building an accurate business case for UC is increasingly complex. Capital costs and licensing are just the tip of the iceberg. What you spend on getting and keeping the solution running — the internal staff, training, third-party vendors and annual maintenance — matters quite a bit. Without a full understanding of all the factors involved in the real cost of ownership, selecting the right vendor and architecture for your organization may be an incredibly daunting task.

In a blog about the research behind today’s session, Nemertes’ Robin Gareiss calls Lync an “expensive operational proposition.” We think it’s important to note that Lync licenses are often Read More »

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