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Connecting Every School in America To High – Speed broadband

September 5, 2013 at 7:55 am PST

In every school district in America today, educators are faced with a simple, yet critically important, question.  How do we obtain, implement, and integrate transformative technology into all of our schools and classrooms?

Some districts have embraced technology and put mobile and collaborative devices in the hands of students.   In The Katy School District in Texas, for instance, performance on math tests increased from 70th to 90th percentile following adoption of mobile technologies and devices. Similarly, in the Mooresville Graded School District in North Carolina, the district increased levels of competency in all subject areas from 60 percent to over 85 percent, and graduation rates increased by 22 percent.

But in too many schools and school districts today, the promise of connected classrooms is just that – a promise, and not reality.

That’s why it’s so critical that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) modernize and streamline the E-Rate program.  E-Rate is the cornerstone of America’s effort to provide digital education to students.  Since the program’s inception 15 years ago, E-Rate has connected more than 100,000 schools and libraries to the internet. It has a proven track record of success.

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In Defense of the American Pay-TV Bundle

By Jason Kohn, Contributing Columnist

It’s not a popular opinion. On the internet, it goes over about as well as saying you hate kittens. But I have to say it: I love the cable bundle.

I realize this goes against the grain. Find any article on the web about bundling of TV channels, and at least 75% of the comments on it will be irate—people fulminating over the injustice of paying for channels they don’t watch, railing at networks for not selling their shows online the day they air, advocating that the entire pay-TV ecosystem be blown up once and for all.

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Interference Detection and Mitigation with Cisco CleanAir

The previous blog on CleanAir went in depth on how MSE uses CleanAir information to locate interferers and the impact zone for each interferer. This blog takes a step back and gives an overview of the CleanAir technology.

How Interference Affects Your WiFi

802.11 devices operate in the 2.4GHz and 5GHz unlicensed bands. These are unregulated and experimental bands. As such, there are way more non-802.11 devices, including but not limited to cordless phones, video cameras, microwave ovens, Bluetooth headsets, DECT phones and even X-Boxes. Now even more devices are coming out that emit in these bands. These devices interfere with your WiFi network since they don’t work cooperatively with 802.11 devices, causing reduced network capacity and coverage, poor quality of voice and video, and link failures.

When an 802.11 device is ready to transmit and it senses interference, it will hold off transmission until it is finished.  If it is in the middle of a transmission where it has sent a packet and never receives an acknowledgement, then it will try to send the packet again. Issues like these  impact the throughput and capacity of your Wireless Network. An interferer like a microwave oven, which emits interference on a 50% Duty Cycle, will reduce the throughput by 50 percent. In the case of an interferer like a video camera, which emits interference at 100% Duty Cycle, when seen at Access Point above CCA threshold will stop the Access Point from beaconing. Due to this clients will not attempt to associate. Read More »

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#EngineersUnplugged S3|Ep11: A Look Behind DevOps

September 4, 2013 at 12:50 pm PST

What happens when the camera stops rolling? Often the conversation doesn’t stop, and sometimes we don’t either. Welcome to a special After Hours edition of Engineers Unplugged, where we do a deeper dive into the earlier conversation with Colin McNamara (@colinmcnamara) and Jay Cuthrell (@qthrul) around DevOps, the evolving way of working, and the pros/cons of waterfall vs iterative build.

“Expectations are being set in the marketplace.” “The ruthless removal of annoyances.” And more intriguing soundbites discussed by Jay Cuthrell in this episode.

Welcome to Engineers Unplugged, where technologists talk to each other the way they know best, with a whiteboard. The rules are simple:

  1. Episodes will publish weekly (or as close to it as we can manage)
  2. Subscribe to the podcast here: engineersunplugged.com
  3. Follow the #engineersunplugged conversation on Twitter
  4. Submit ideas for episodes or volunteer to appear by Tweeting to @CommsNinja
  5. Practice drawing unicorns
Multilingual? Get your geek button on.

Multilingual? Get your geek button on.

What’s your take from the DevOps or the end user side? Have you employed a different methodology in your org? Post a comment here, or join the conversation on Twitter. Follow us @CiscoDC.

Habla Geek? Join us for Season 4 shoot at VMworld Barcelona! Ping me @CommsNinja for details.

 

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Cisco in the Contact Center Business: Reflecting Back and Looking Ahead

With Cisco recently closing our fiscal year, I naturally started to reflect on the past year in our contact center business, and on our history in this market.  Since Cisco entered the contact center market in 1999, the industry has changed in countless ways.  We’ve seen technologies come and go.  We’ve seen an explosion in the number of channels customers use to connect with companies.  We’ve seen the mobile device become the primary entry point to many contact centers—regardless of channel.  And we’ve seen start-ups, new business models, consolidations, and divestitures.

With all of these changes and inflection points over the last decade or so, Cisco has been able to make its mark in the contact center industry.  We’ve grown steadily over the last several years.  In fact, Cisco became one of the top three Contact Center vendors after only five years in the market. As we’ve continued to grow and lead in this industry, we have shipped nearly 3 million Contact Center agent seats, providing the front line personnel with the resources needed to maintain relationships with customers. Cisco shipped 900,000 seats in just the past two years – and the impact that Cisco contact center solutions are making on the level of customer care offered by businesses of all sizes shows no signs of slowing down!

Today, universities fielding more than 25,000 student calls daily, financial institutions using 10,000 customer service agents to answer customer calls and inquiries, and countless other businesses rely on Cisco’s leading Contact Center technology to provide outstanding service and easily manage customer relationships to improve business.

On average, more than 2,600 businesses Read More »

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