Cisco Blogs

Cisco Blog > The Platform

Japanese and Korean High School Students Demonstrate their Leadership and Business Acumen in Junior Achievement, Accenture and Cisco Sponsored Travel and Tourism Business Competition

Earlier this week on February 5, 2012, 50 high school students from 10 high schools in Japan and Korea participated in the final round of the Travel and Tourism Business Program (TTBiz) Competition via Cisco TelePresence.

TTBiz is an educational program offered by Junior Achievement, an international non-governmental organisation (NGO), and Accenture that provides high school students around the world with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate global business and leadership skills in the travel and tourism industry.  

The competition involved Korean and Japanese high school students teaming up to research, discuss and create travel proposals on “how to increase the number of Korean travelers to Japan.” This topic, which focused on promoting the Japanese tourism industry by attracting more Korean visitors to Japan, is aimed at helping tourism in Japan which has been greatly impacted by last year’s devastating earthquake and tsunami. Representatives of the Japan National Tourism Organization participated in the program as judges.

To provide an engaging environment for real-time dialogue and information sharing in the final competition, as the technology sponsor of TTBiz, Cisco provided its TelePresence and WebEx solutions to the high school students.

Read More »

Customers are Ready to Embrace the ‘World of Many Clouds’—Are You?

Think cloud isn’t the next big thing in the evolution of IT? By 2015, experts predict cloud traffic will grow 12 times to reach 1.6 zettabytes—yes, zettabytes. That’s more than four days of business-class video for every single person on the planet.

So listen up, partners. Cisco is backing cloud 100 percent, and they’re ready to work with you to help enable the world of many clouds. Whether it’s planning, building, or running clouds, the opportunities are enormous. There’s also a great deal of complexity.

But not to worry. Cisco has you covered.

As part of its Cloud Partner Program, Cisco is offering Collaborative Professional Services (CPS) for Cloud. This Cisco Services offering shares intellectual capital, smart service innovation, demand generation, and a global delivery infrastructure with partners—all to help you develop profitable cloud solutions that will put a smile on every customer’s face.

Believe me. Your enterprise, service provider, small business, and government customers want a trusted cloud advisor. By transitioning to cloud, they’re likely to reduce costs, increase efficiency, and gain strategic advantage. Wonder who they’ll thank for the help? Read More »

Tags: , , ,

Cisco Support Community: Winner of the 2011 Forrester Groundswell Award for Supporting Social Media

Many companies today are jumping on the bandwagon to add custom social media accounts to their list of web properties. The Cisco Support Community team is one such group, but this team has done so particularly well and seen great successes with their endeavors.

In early 2010, they launched and revamped their social initiatives in hopes of staying connected with customers and extending the community beyond Cisco’s immediate reach. Just over a year afterward, the team was recognized as the winner of the 2011 Forrester Groundswell Award in the B2B Supporting Category. What’s more, Cisco estimates that the community-based support on Facebook and Twitter is saving the company more than $400K annually! Not everybody rises to fame with the fruits of their social media labor. I was curious to find out what the team did that led to such positive results, so I chatted with Pratibha Gupta and Mohan Rao, leads of the social media branch of the Support Community team.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cisco Unified Computing XML API with Curl and xmlstarlet

One of my favorite books is The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follet, I’ve read it and reread it many times and each time I read it I get something new out of it.  With so many good books out there it seems silly to reread a book, especially a very long book. I think what it is, is that the story is so good, the characters so compelling that I don’t want to leave them and when I’m finished with the book I miss them.  Fortunately the book was made into a mini-series that I enjoyed and brought a nice visualization of the story.  I also think the mini-series may have attracted a new set of readers in the viewing audience.

New audiences come with new methods of distribution for the same, similar or different presentation of an already published work.  With the intent to reach a new audience I am republishing a UCS XML API focused blog from another blog site on Cisco Developer Network UCS Section.  I wrote this blog in April 2010, but the methods utilized seemed to flow from my prior entries on this site.The previously published blog has references to other blogs on the on the Cisco Developer Network site in the Cisco UCS section.

The previous blog…

Last time I wrote about using telnet to connect to the UCS Manager XML API as a way to introduce the API and show it’s lack of complexity. Now I don’t expect anyone to write an application that uses telnet to manage a UCS system, I just wanted to get across that if text, XML structured text, can be pushed across an open port to the listening API process on the UCS then it doesn’t matter how the push is done.

However telnet is not very practical, so I thought I would write about curl and xmlstarlet (xmlstarlet referred to as xml in this entry). curl is used to handle the request and response cycle with the UCS and xml is used to process the XML response. In some of my early scripts I used sed and awk to “parse” the output. I say parse but it was more pattern matching; by the way sed and awk are great tools, but maybe I’m partial to them because I’ve been around for a while. The reason I started with curl, sed and awk was not because I lacked XML experience but because I wanted to appeal to the administrators out there and show that XML experience, while beneficial, is not specifically needed.

Read More »

Tags: , , , ,

Workload Automation, Job Scheduling, Applications and the Move to Cloud

In an earlier part of my career I learned the extreme importance of Workload Automation, aka Job Scheduling.  Workload automation is the oldest IT technology on the planet coming from the need to schedule jobs on an IBM Mainframe.   Job Scheduling has evolved from driving JCL (Job Control Language) to Workload Automation where the Scheduler stitches together batch and real time activities across mainframes, proprietary OS systems, x86 systems, applications (both packages and commercial off the shelf such as SAP or Oracle or Informatica) and now web service enabled applications whether they be onsite or in the cloud.  Walk into the operations center of any data driven company and you will see multiple screens where operations are monitoring the state of these jobs.  Why are they so critical?  Over 50% of all transactions that occur on this planet are batch in nature.  They are scheduled based upon specific times or based upon dependencies being met.  These workloads can be a complex  and interrelated set of activities.  Effectively these job streams are the business processes that drive modern enterprises.

Without these jobs companies don’t get information (and large amounts of it) in the right place at the right time.  Most companies today could not close out their financial quarters without enterprise schedulers to move data from their disparate systems into a consolidate place for either the general ledger to close out or for a critical Business Intelligence report to run to drive placement of the correct product into the specific physical location to serve the global economy.  Workload automation tools open and close stock exchanges and process all the transaction data from trades.  They also drive compliance checks.  This is important stuff for the global economy!  This was my realization in touring key operations centers and realizing that half of the big monitors were covering the movement of batch data in the enterprise.

Read More »

Tags: , , , , , ,