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Enterprise Video & Medianet at Cisco Live London

If I had to summarize Cisco Live London in one word, I choose “educational”. In the four days I was at Cisco Live London, I had the opportunity to meet our local medianet experts, Patrick Charretour and Peter Matthews, learn about our broad core network portfolio, and listen to the challenges our customers face as they use video solutions in their organization.  Whether customers are deploying video surveillance, signage, or telepresence, each seemed to want help on where to start with their deployment and wondering if medianet would be the solution.

Conversations at the medianet station were engaging and all seem to start with the same question, “What is medianet?”.  Medianet is Cisco’s end-to-end video architecture, optimize for the pervasive deployment of video. So at Cisco Live, we demonstrated how Cisco’s medianet architecture makes it easier for you to plan, deploy and manage video in your organization.  Using Cisco TelePresence EX 90 systems, we demonstrated the performance monitoring and mediatrace capabilities in a Cisco medianet, allowing application and network managers to easily identify and troubleshoot issues that may occur during a telepresence call.  We also showed a new capability, but since we haven’t officially launched it, I can’t say much.  You’ll just have to go to Interop Las Vegas or Cisco Live San Diego to find out.

Peter showing a mediatrace of the TelePresence session

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Live from IPv6 World Congress: Norway’s Altibox Discusses IPv6

During our customer reception for the V6 World Congress 2012 we had an opportunity to discuss the impact and opportunity of IPv6 on the industry. Ragnar Anfinsen, Senior Architect CPE of Norway’s Altibox AS was kind enough to share his thoughts with us.

Although they’ve got it running in the lab and their core network, the next step will be to enable IPv6 Read More »

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Medianet at Cisco Live London

February 10, 2012 at 12:53 pm PST

Last week, Cisco hosted another fantastic Cisco Live Europe in London. Over 6000 people were in attendance during the event this time around and this was very visible in the crowds in the world of solutions as well as the class rooms.

Also very visible, was the growing impact of video not only in the lives of the people attending but also the networks that they are building and caring for. I talked to a very passionate video conferencing administrator that proudly described how video conferencing technology has been saving lives on offshore oil platforms by connecting nurses with medical specialists. The network quality and transmission is critical in these cases and the case for video (for a variety of applications) is driving a re-evaluation of how the network could be designed and optimized. The next day I talked with a network operator that was struggling to deliver on a mandate from management to provide video conferencing and town hall type meetings to an already stretched thin network.

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Telegraph vs. Internet: Which Had Greater Impact?

2012 is the bicentennial of the War of 1812.  You may remember just two things about this period from your high school history class.  First, in an act of ignominy for the Americans, the British burned down the capital.  Second, the war ended with the resounding defeat of the British by the heroic General Andrew Jackson in January 1815, in what was the war’s only set-piece battle between the opposing sides.  Jackson eventually rode this victory into the Presidency.

There is only one problem with this battle.  It took place after the war was over.  The previous month, in Europe, the two sides had agreed to peace.  But in those days, communications was so slow that word of the peace didn’t reach New Orleans until February 1815.

Fast forward, approximately forty-eight years later, to the Civil War.  In the period between these two wars, in 1831, Morse thought up the idea for the electronic telegraph.  The Union Army had mastered its quick deployment, so that in 1863 while sitting in Washington, President Lincoln could read almost real time reports from the battlefields many miles away.

book cover

This was a dramatic increase in the speed of communications.  Not all that many decades later, telegraph lines and cables would unite the world.  Yet this did not fundamentally change the way people worked or lived or governed themselves.

So consider 2011, when the US Navy Seals got Osama Bin Laden.  There was a tweet about helicopters within several minutes, but the author didn’t know why the helicopters were nearby.  The first tweet with some confirmation came about forty-five minutes before President Obama made his announcement.

Now think back about forty-eight years before to November 22, 1963 and the assassination of President John Kennedy.  The news was out quickly all over television and radio and newspapers.  Walter Cronkite famously told the viewers of CBS News that the President had died thirty-eight minutes before.

Unlike the 19th century examples, there was no dramatic speed up in the reporting of these two more recent events separated by roughly forty-eight years.  While we may have more sources of information in more places now than in 1963, word doesn’t get out all that much faster.  You could argue that the Telegraph had a greater impact on communications than the Internet.

Yet many of us have the feeling that our world has been changed by this communications.  Why is that?

I think it has to do with the changing nature of the work we do.  In the mid-19th century, more than three quarters of Americans made things or grew food.  In 2011, less than a quarter do so and the rest of us provide services — and increasingly intangible services, including ideas, knowledge, entertainment and the like which is delivered digitally.  Because better digital communications directly speeds up the delivery of these services, we see the impact more.  It’s the increasing availability of high quality communications, in conjunction with these significant socio-economic trends, which will continue to change our lives.

Please share with us how you’ve seen the confluence of these two trends? Reply here and visit the Cisco Public Sector Customer Connection Community.

[picture credit for Battle of New Orleans http://www.frenchcreoles.com/battnozz.jpg]

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No Ride for Revere with the Right Network

We saw what happened when William Wallace upgraded to the Right Network, but how about Paul Revere? Equipped with a Cisco Cius tablet and a reliable wireless connection, Paul can quickly communicate the impending British invasion to fellow Patriots. There’s no need for a midnight ride when you’ve got the Right Network.

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