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London 2012: the ICT Infrastructure Investment

In my first editorial in this series, I introduced the notion of some very bold aspirations for community regeneration and economic growth, that’s about to occur in East London.

I’m sharing the following key data points about the London 2012 socioeconomic impact, to give you an idea of the scale of this purposeful investment strategy — and the anticipated economic development related outcomes.

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How the Role of the Social Strategist is Evolving

Social business is about using diverse social technologies to easily connect with one another. In my previous video blog post, we learned some present and future trends within this realm, and how it’s evolving. Let’s continue that train of thought and delve deeper.

Let’s Get This Social Media Party Started

According to Industry Analyst Jeremiah Owyang, “the social business space is still very immature, and things are just heating up” (Owyang, “Social Business: We’re Just Getting Started”). As more and more companies jump on the social media bandwagon, it’s essential that they remember to holistically integrate social business into the corporation. Before getting started with social, Jeremiah recommends conducting an internal analysis of your organization to figure out which of the 5 organizational models your company is currently in and which you aspire to be in. Afterward, employees must realize that incorporating social into their business is likely to be a slow process since it’s much of a major cultural change that their company will undergo.

The Role of the Social Strategist Amidst It All

Many people know that social media is not free – it requires a lot of time, money and people resources. One of the key players that constitute social business is the social strategist. As this realm continues to develop, how will the role of the social strategist change? Will it disappear or become further embedded into a corporation somehow? We wanted to hear what “social media guy at LinkedIn” Mario Sundar (@mariosundar) and Jeremiah (@jowyang) thought about this topic. Watch this short video recapping their words of wisdom:

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Keith Goodwin Announces Retirement, Bruce Klein New Cisco WWPO Leader

Today, Keith Goodwin, SVP of Cisco’s Worldwide Partner Organization, is announcing his retirement after 13 years with Cisco and 38 years in the IT industry. Keith has been a strong leader, colleague, and friend to so many partners during his time at Cisco.

Starting on August 1, SVP Bruce Klein will become the new leader of Cisco’s Worldwide Partner Organization.

Read more details as EVP Rob Lloyd blogs about Keith’s career, Bruce’s leadership style, and our commitment to our partner-centric strategy. Read More »

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Bruce Klein to Lead Worldwide Partner Organization

Last week, when we announced senior leadership changes within Cisco Services and APJC, we referenced additional planned changes that would demonstrate the incredible depth and breadth of Cisco’s leadership talent. Today, it is with mixed emotions that I announce Keith Goodwin, SVP Worldwide Partner Organization (WWPO), has decided to retire after 13 successful years with Cisco and 38 years in the IT industry. While Keith’s departure is a loss for all of us, I am excited to share that another outstanding leader, SVP Bruce Klein, will become the new leader of Cisco’s Worldwide Partner Organization. On another positive note, I am delighted to announce that Patrick Finn, SVP, Federal will lead the U.S. Public Sector theater.

Keith has been a tremendous colleague and a great friend to me and many of you. During his impactful career at Cisco, Keith has led WW Sales Operations, the Americas International Theater and for the last seven years WWPO. Keith has built the industry’s strongest partner leadership team including Edison Peres, Wendy Bahr and Andrew Sage.

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New UCS Servers Expand the Portfolio: More Third Generation Fabric Computing from Cisco

Back in March we announced the third generation of UCS, with significant expansions to the I/O and systems management capabilities of the platform as well as a new lineup of servers.  This month we’re continuing to expand the UCS server lineup with the addition of four new models.  The latest batch of M3 systems are comprised of three Intel Xeon “EN” class machines (E5-2400 series processors) as well as a four socket “EP” (E5-2600 series) blade server.   Specifically: the UCS B22 and B420 M3 blades and the C22 and C24 M3 rack servers.  These new servers round out the UCS portfolio with an even stronger set of products optimized for scale-out and light general-purpose computing as well as a new price/performance 4S category in the mid-range.

If you prefer watching than reading , here is a nice conversation between  Intel Boyd Davis , VP & GM, Data Center Infrastructure group, Cisco Jim McHugh, VP UCS Marketing, and Scott Ciccone, Sr. Product Marketing Manager, highlighting the key benefits of these new models.

To figure out how these fit in, let’s step back and consider the broader evolution of server technology in play here:

1)  Cisco has made server I/O more powerful and much simpler.

One of the key differentiators of UCS is the way in which high-capacity server network access has been aggregated through Cisco Virtual Interface Cards and infused with built-in high performance virtual networking capabilities.   In “pre-UCS” server system architectures, one of the main design considerations was the type and quantity of physical network adapters required.  Networking, combined with computing sockets/cores/frequency/cache, system memory, and local disk are historically the primary resources considered in the balancing act of cost, physical space and power consumption, all of which are manifested in the various permutations of server designs required to cover the myriad of workloads most efficiently.  Think of these as your four server subsystem food groups.  Architecture purists will remind us that everything outside the processors and their cache falls into the category of “I/O” but let’s not get pedantic because that will mess up my food group analogy.   In UCS, I/O is effectively taken off the table as a design worry because every server gets its full USRDA of networking through the VIC:  helping portions of bandwidth, rich with Fabric Extender technology vitamins that yield hundreds of Ethernet and FC adapters through one physical device.  Gone are the days of hemming and hawing over how many mezz card slots your blade has or how many cards you’re going to need to feed that hungry stack of VM’s on your rack server.  This simplification changes things for the better because it takes a lot of complication out of the equation.

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